2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158543
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Older Adults' Quality of Life
Abstract:
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Older Adults' Quality of Life
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Schneider, Joanne, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Saint Louis University
Contact Address:, St. Louis, MO, 63104, USA
Co-Authors:J.H. Cook, McKendree College, Lebanon, IL
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare older adults' health-related quality of life (HRQL) at 6, 9, and 12 months after initiation of exercise across three groups of older adults: a cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) group, an attention-control health promotion (HP) group, and a control group. A secondary purpose was to examine these effects while controlling for perceived physical functioning. Background: Compared to their sedentary peers, older adults who exercise reduce their risk for multiple poor outcomes. Yet, in 2003 more than 54% of older adults did not maintain the recommended level of exercise. HRQL, the subjective appraisal of function, is instrumental to the understanding older adults' health behaviors. Participants: A total of 332 participants were recruited; 252 (75.9%) were female; 289 (87.0%) were White, 41 (12.3%) were Black. Mean age was 71.8 +/- 5.1 yrs. Participants were stratified by gender and randomized to group. Methods: CBT was guided by the self-regulation of exercise maintenance model in which behavior is influenced by interpretations of exercise. CBT participants were trained to recognize and modify their negative interpretations. HP participants received health education not related to exercise. All participants received exercise training and completed the SF-36 (a measure of HRQL) at baseline and at 6, 9, and 12 months. Results: Groups did not differ on baseline variables. Total exercise behavior was not different at 6, 9, or 12 months or across groups. Hierarchical linear modeling showed that after controlling for physical functioning, participants reported that their emotional status interfered less with their activities and that their emotional well-being, general health, and overall HRQL improved. However, CBT participants actually reported less improvement over time than the other two groups. Conclusions: CBT may have heightened participants' awareness of their physical functioning. Older participants may need more time to reframe perceptions of loss to opportunities for improvement/maintenance and to interpret soreness as symptoms of regaining muscle strength. Interventions that allow participants to express thoughts and emotions about their quality of life also need to be explored. Funded by NINR NR04771
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCognitive Behavioral Therapy and Older Adults' Quality of Lifeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158543-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Older Adults' Quality of Life</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Schneider, Joanne, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Saint Louis University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, St. Louis, MO, 63104, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">schneijk@slu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">J.H. Cook, McKendree College, Lebanon, IL</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare older adults' health-related quality of life (HRQL) at 6, 9, and 12 months after initiation of exercise across three groups of older adults: a cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) group, an attention-control health promotion (HP) group, and a control group. A secondary purpose was to examine these effects while controlling for perceived physical functioning. Background: Compared to their sedentary peers, older adults who exercise reduce their risk for multiple poor outcomes. Yet, in 2003 more than 54% of older adults did not maintain the recommended level of exercise. HRQL, the subjective appraisal of function, is instrumental to the understanding older adults' health behaviors. Participants: A total of 332 participants were recruited; 252 (75.9%) were female; 289 (87.0%) were White, 41 (12.3%) were Black. Mean age was 71.8 +/- 5.1 yrs. Participants were stratified by gender and randomized to group. Methods: CBT was guided by the self-regulation of exercise maintenance model in which behavior is influenced by interpretations of exercise. CBT participants were trained to recognize and modify their negative interpretations. HP participants received health education not related to exercise. All participants received exercise training and completed the SF-36 (a measure of HRQL) at baseline and at 6, 9, and 12 months. Results: Groups did not differ on baseline variables. Total exercise behavior was not different at 6, 9, or 12 months or across groups. Hierarchical linear modeling showed that after controlling for physical functioning, participants reported that their emotional status interfered less with their activities and that their emotional well-being, general health, and overall HRQL improved. However, CBT participants actually reported less improvement over time than the other two groups. Conclusions: CBT may have heightened participants' awareness of their physical functioning. Older participants may need more time to reframe perceptions of loss to opportunities for improvement/maintenance and to interpret soreness as symptoms of regaining muscle strength. Interventions that allow participants to express thoughts and emotions about their quality of life also need to be explored. Funded by NINR NR04771</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:09:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:09:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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