Registered Nurses' Self-Reported Health and Health Behaviors: Do We Practice What We Preach?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158546
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Registered Nurses' Self-Reported Health and Health Behaviors: Do We Practice What We Preach?
Abstract:
Registered Nurses' Self-Reported Health and Health Behaviors: Do We Practice What We Preach?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Tucker, Sharon, DNSc
P.I. Institution Name:Mayo Clinic College of Medicine
Contact Address:Nursing, Rochester, MN, 55905, USA
Co-Authors:M. Harris and T. Pipe, Nursing, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN
BACKGROUND: The growing obesity epidemic and associated health problems, plus escalating health care costs have drawn substantial attention to the value of health promotion behaviors and practices, particularly among employers whose insurance plans have soared. Nurses are a group of employees that might be expected to have strong health promotion behaviors given that health promotion is a hallmark of their professional practices. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to describe registered nurses' self-reported physical and mental health, work related injuries, modifiable risk behaviors, and life stress, within the context of their professional environment. METHOD: A large cohort of registered nurses across multiple affiliated health care sites (n=5) in geographically diverse locations completed an electronic anonymous survey with informed consent. The survey included: 31-item Professional Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index (PES-NWI), 16 demographic items, 9 caring behavior items, and 31 health items. RESULTS: Within the 5 sites, 3134 participants completed most of the survey items (91% female, 96% white, 74% married, and average age = 42.18 [SD=10.9, n=3105]). Although 80% of nurses rated their overall health as very good or excellent, less than one-third reported engaging in moderate physical activity of 30 minutes/day more than 5 days/week, 85% reported they ate fast food or snacks 1-3/week, and average BMI (calculated from height and weight) was 26.75 (SD=5.86, n=;2928) with 53% over 25. Nurses reported past verbal abuse from patients (62%), colleagues (44%) and partner/important person (24%); and past physical abuse from patients (33%) and partner/important person (10%). Back injuries were reported by 24% and needle sticks by 33%. 68-80% reported they were handling personal problems, feeling positive and maintaining control over their lives in the past month. CONCLUSIONS: These nurses' health data differ from the national longitudinal nurses' health study by focusing on nurses' health reports in the context of their work environments. The data suggest inconsistencies between nurses' perceptions and current health promotion standards. Future research can focus on work-site strategies for engaging nurses' in health promotion behaviors.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRegistered Nurses' Self-Reported Health and Health Behaviors: Do We Practice What We Preach?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158546-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Registered Nurses' Self-Reported Health and Health Behaviors: Do We Practice What We Preach?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tucker, Sharon, DNSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Mayo Clinic College of Medicine</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing, Rochester, MN, 55905, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tucker.sharon@mayo.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">M. Harris and T. Pipe, Nursing, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">BACKGROUND: The growing obesity epidemic and associated health problems, plus escalating health care costs have drawn substantial attention to the value of health promotion behaviors and practices, particularly among employers whose insurance plans have soared. Nurses are a group of employees that might be expected to have strong health promotion behaviors given that health promotion is a hallmark of their professional practices. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to describe registered nurses' self-reported physical and mental health, work related injuries, modifiable risk behaviors, and life stress, within the context of their professional environment. METHOD: A large cohort of registered nurses across multiple affiliated health care sites (n=5) in geographically diverse locations completed an electronic anonymous survey with informed consent. The survey included: 31-item Professional Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index (PES-NWI), 16 demographic items, 9 caring behavior items, and 31 health items. RESULTS: Within the 5 sites, 3134 participants completed most of the survey items (91% female, 96% white, 74% married, and average age = 42.18 [SD=10.9, n=3105]). Although 80% of nurses rated their overall health as very good or excellent, less than one-third reported engaging in moderate physical activity of 30 minutes/day more than 5 days/week, 85% reported they ate fast food or snacks 1-3/week, and average BMI (calculated from height and weight) was 26.75 (SD=5.86, n=;2928) with 53% over 25. Nurses reported past verbal abuse from patients (62%), colleagues (44%) and partner/important person (24%); and past physical abuse from patients (33%) and partner/important person (10%). Back injuries were reported by 24% and needle sticks by 33%. 68-80% reported they were handling personal problems, feeling positive and maintaining control over their lives in the past month. CONCLUSIONS: These nurses' health data differ from the national longitudinal nurses' health study by focusing on nurses' health reports in the context of their work environments. The data suggest inconsistencies between nurses' perceptions and current health promotion standards. Future research can focus on work-site strategies for engaging nurses' in health promotion behaviors.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:09:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:09:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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