2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158550
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Clinical experience in recognizing depression: What is it made of?
Abstract:
Clinical experience in recognizing depression: What is it made of?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Baik, Seong-Yi, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Cincinnati
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 262 Procter Hall 3110 Vine St, Cincinnati, OH, 45221-0038, USA
Contact Telephone:(513)-558-5219
Co-Authors:Barbara J. Bowers, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor
The purposes of this study were to identify processes by which primary care providers recognize depression in patients presenting with symptoms that might indicate depression and the conditions that influence those processes. A previous presentation focused on three processes used by PCPs in recognizing depression ("ruling out," "opening the door," and "recognizing the person") and three conditions ("familiarity with the patient," "general clinical experience," and "time availability") that influence how this is done. The purpose of this presentation is to describe one of those conditions, general clinical experience, in detail, in the recognition of depression in primary care settings. The grounded theory methodology was used for data collection and analysis. In-depth, in-person interviews were conducted with a purposeful sample of thirteen providers (general internists, family physicians, nurse practitioners, and mental health care providers) who work in primary care settings. All interviews were audiotaped and transcribed for analysis purposes. Six multiple dimensions of general clinical experience were identified: "knowing your patients," "knowing your own practice pattern," "understanding what being a doctor [health care provider] is about," "being aware of your own emotions," "learning what works in the real world," and "thinking outside the box." In contrast to common understandings, the findings reveal how the recognition of depression requires more than knowledge, skill, and length of experience. The findings suggest that recognizing depression requires care providers to understand themselves and their patients in the interactional context of their practice. While knowledge training is the most frequent means of attempting to influence practice effectiveness, this study suggests that knowledge alone is unlikely to have a significant impact on a clinician's competence in identifying and treating depression. Implications for clinical practice, health services research, and health policy are discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleClinical experience in recognizing depression: What is it made of?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158550-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Clinical experience in recognizing depression: What is it made of?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Baik, Seong-Yi, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Cincinnati</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 262 Procter Hall 3110 Vine St, Cincinnati, OH, 45221-0038, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(513)-558-5219</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">seongyi.baik@uc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Barbara J. Bowers, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purposes of this study were to identify processes by which primary care providers recognize depression in patients presenting with symptoms that might indicate depression and the conditions that influence those processes. A previous presentation focused on three processes used by PCPs in recognizing depression (&quot;ruling out,&quot; &quot;opening the door,&quot; and &quot;recognizing the person&quot;) and three conditions (&quot;familiarity with the patient,&quot; &quot;general clinical experience,&quot; and &quot;time availability&quot;) that influence how this is done. The purpose of this presentation is to describe one of those conditions, general clinical experience, in detail, in the recognition of depression in primary care settings. The grounded theory methodology was used for data collection and analysis. In-depth, in-person interviews were conducted with a purposeful sample of thirteen providers (general internists, family physicians, nurse practitioners, and mental health care providers) who work in primary care settings. All interviews were audiotaped and transcribed for analysis purposes. Six multiple dimensions of general clinical experience were identified: &quot;knowing your patients,&quot; &quot;knowing your own practice pattern,&quot; &quot;understanding what being a doctor [health care provider] is about,&quot; &quot;being aware of your own emotions,&quot; &quot;learning what works in the real world,&quot; and &quot;thinking outside the box.&quot; In contrast to common understandings, the findings reveal how the recognition of depression requires more than knowledge, skill, and length of experience. The findings suggest that recognizing depression requires care providers to understand themselves and their patients in the interactional context of their practice. While knowledge training is the most frequent means of attempting to influence practice effectiveness, this study suggests that knowledge alone is unlikely to have a significant impact on a clinician's competence in identifying and treating depression. Implications for clinical practice, health services research, and health policy are discussed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:10:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:10:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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