Effects of Racism, Cultural Mistrust, and Trust in Physicians on Satisfaction with Care

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158551
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of Racism, Cultural Mistrust, and Trust in Physicians on Satisfaction with Care
Abstract:
Effects of Racism, Cultural Mistrust, and Trust in Physicians on Satisfaction with Care
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Benkert, Ramona, PhD, APRN
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Adult/Gerontology Nursing, 5557 Cass Ave - 370 Cohn, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
Contact Telephone:313 577 413
Co-Authors:Rosalind M. Peters, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; Rodney Clark, PhD, Associate Professor; Nutrena Tate, MSN, Pre-doctoral Fellow; and Kathryn Keves-Foster, MSN, Instructor
Problem: Health disparities in the prevalence and control of hypertension have been linked to racism, cultural mistrust, lack of trust in physicians, and satisfaction with care. Yet studies examining physician trust have been done on predominantly non-Hispanic White populations, and no studies have been found that examine the relationships among these variables in an African American population.

Purpose: To examine the influence of perceived racism, cultural mistrust, and trust in physicians on satisfaction with care among hypertensive African Americans who are established patient in an urban ambulatory clinic.

Methods: Subjects were 138 African Americans; 27-68 years (M=49.6; SD=8.34); 53% women; 47% men. Instruments included the Racism and Life Experiences Scale (RaLES), Cultural Mistrust Inventory (CMI), Trust in Physician Scale (TPS), and the Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire (PSQ). Cronbach's alphas ranged from .80-92. Path analysis techniques were used.

Results: Few subjects (8%) reported high mistrust, high perceived racism (16%); high trust in physicians (10%), or high satisfaction with care (25%). Strong positive correlations were noted between CMI and RaLES (0.54 p = 0.000), and PSQ and TPS (0.44, p =.000). Moderate, inverse relationships were noted between CMI and TPS (-0.37, p=.000), CMI and PSQ (-0.25, p=.003); RaLES and TPS (-0.23, p=007), and RaLES with PSQ (-0.27, p=.002); 20% of the variance in satisfaction with care was explained by the predictor variables, and 14% of trust in physicians was explained by racism and mistrust.

Conclusion: Experiences of racism contribute to cultural mistrust and together these affect the patient provider relationship and satisfaction with care.

Acknowledgements: The authors thank the funding agencies for partial funding of the study. (Agency name withheld to avoid any reference to the internal funding source).
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of Racism, Cultural Mistrust, and Trust in Physicians on Satisfaction with Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158551-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effects of Racism, Cultural Mistrust, and Trust in Physicians on Satisfaction with Care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Benkert, Ramona, PhD, APRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Adult/Gerontology Nursing, 5557 Cass Ave - 370 Cohn, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">313 577 413</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ramonabenkert@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Rosalind M. Peters, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; Rodney Clark, PhD, Associate Professor; Nutrena Tate, MSN, Pre-doctoral Fellow; and Kathryn Keves-Foster, MSN, Instructor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Health disparities in the prevalence and control of hypertension have been linked to racism, cultural mistrust, lack of trust in physicians, and satisfaction with care. Yet studies examining physician trust have been done on predominantly non-Hispanic White populations, and no studies have been found that examine the relationships among these variables in an African American population. <br/><br/>Purpose: To examine the influence of perceived racism, cultural mistrust, and trust in physicians on satisfaction with care among hypertensive African Americans who are established patient in an urban ambulatory clinic.<br/><br/>Methods: Subjects were 138 African Americans; 27-68 years (M=49.6; SD=8.34); 53% women; 47% men. Instruments included the Racism and Life Experiences Scale (RaLES), Cultural Mistrust Inventory (CMI), Trust in Physician Scale (TPS), and the Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire (PSQ). Cronbach's alphas ranged from .80-92. Path analysis techniques were used. <br/><br/>Results: Few subjects (8%) reported high mistrust, high perceived racism (16%); high trust in physicians (10%), or high satisfaction with care (25%). Strong positive correlations were noted between CMI and RaLES (0.54 p = 0.000), and PSQ and TPS (0.44, p =.000). Moderate, inverse relationships were noted between CMI and TPS (-0.37, p=.000), CMI and PSQ (-0.25, p=.003); RaLES and TPS (-0.23, p=007), and RaLES with PSQ (-0.27, p=.002); 20% of the variance in satisfaction with care was explained by the predictor variables, and 14% of trust in physicians was explained by racism and mistrust.<br/><br/>Conclusion: Experiences of racism contribute to cultural mistrust and together these affect the patient provider relationship and satisfaction with care. <br/><br/>Acknowledgements: The authors thank the funding agencies for partial funding of the study. (Agency name withheld to avoid any reference to the internal funding source).</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:10:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:10:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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