2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158554
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Women and Tobacco Addiction: Implications for Treatment and Future Research
Abstract:
Women and Tobacco Addiction: Implications for Treatment and Future Research
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Buchanan, Lynne, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nebraska Medical Center
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA
Contact Telephone:402-559-6629
Co-Authors:Sheila Likness, BSN, RN
The purpose of this study is to describe demographics, tobacco history, health status, and psychosocial response of women addicted to tobacco in order to design a future multicomponent intervention that includes a personal digital assistant for home follow-up. Although women have different responses when quitting, there is little differentiation in treatment. Data was collected from a sample of 48 women from a hospital and clinic setting in the Midwest. Inclusion criteria were: adults, stable condition, not pregnant, smoking but had set a quit date and were developing a quit plan. Variables were demographics, tobacco history, and a battery of instruments to collect biopsychosocial characteristics. Findings showed the age was 45.2 (+/-11), and 82% were Caucasian, 18% married, 38% unmarried/living with a partner, and 42% unmarried/living alone. Only 19% reported regular exercise and BMI was 29.3 (+/-8). Pack years was 33.92 (+/-21.33), Fagerstrom dependence score was 7.0 (+/-2.1), self-efficacy to quit was 7.0 (+/-2.1), and number of times quit in the past was only 2.0 (+/-1.9). The CESD depression score was 23.83 (+/-12.0), 38% reported taking antidepressants and 54% had a history of depression. A spouse, child or other relative was chosen as a support partner for the quit plan but 40% of partners smoked. Positive/negative partner interaction ratio was 2.1 (+/-1.7). Positive interaction correlated at the p<.05 level with BMI (r = .249), alcohol (r = -.215) and age of first cigarette (r= - 243). The CESD correlated with income (r = - .223, p < .10) and self-efficacy (r = -.242, p< .10). Findings support an evidence based approach when treating tobacco dependence and that women are a special population. In this sample, there was an inverse relation between depression and self-efficacy which may explain why women have more difficulty quitting and make less quit attempts.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWomen and Tobacco Addiction: Implications for Treatment and Future Researchen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158554-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Women and Tobacco Addiction: Implications for Treatment and Future Research</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Buchanan, Lynne, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nebraska Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">402-559-6629</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lbuchanan@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Sheila Likness, BSN, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study is to describe demographics, tobacco history, health status, and psychosocial response of women addicted to tobacco in order to design a future multicomponent intervention that includes a personal digital assistant for home follow-up. Although women have different responses when quitting, there is little differentiation in treatment. Data was collected from a sample of 48 women from a hospital and clinic setting in the Midwest. Inclusion criteria were: adults, stable condition, not pregnant, smoking but had set a quit date and were developing a quit plan. Variables were demographics, tobacco history, and a battery of instruments to collect biopsychosocial characteristics. Findings showed the age was 45.2 (+/-11), and 82% were Caucasian, 18% married, 38% unmarried/living with a partner, and 42% unmarried/living alone. Only 19% reported regular exercise and BMI was 29.3 (+/-8). Pack years was 33.92 (+/-21.33), Fagerstrom dependence score was 7.0 (+/-2.1), self-efficacy to quit was 7.0 (+/-2.1), and number of times quit in the past was only 2.0 (+/-1.9). The CESD depression score was 23.83 (+/-12.0), 38% reported taking antidepressants and 54% had a history of depression. A spouse, child or other relative was chosen as a support partner for the quit plan but 40% of partners smoked. Positive/negative partner interaction ratio was 2.1 (+/-1.7). Positive interaction correlated at the p&lt;.05 level with BMI (r = .249), alcohol (r = -.215) and age of first cigarette (r= - 243). The CESD correlated with income (r = - .223, p &lt; .10) and self-efficacy (r = -.242, p&lt; .10). Findings support an evidence based approach when treating tobacco dependence and that women are a special population. In this sample, there was an inverse relation between depression and self-efficacy which may explain why women have more difficulty quitting and make less quit attempts.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:10:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:10:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.