2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158555
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Children's Appraisal and Response to Fourth Grade Proficiency Testing
Abstract:
Children's Appraisal and Response to Fourth Grade Proficiency Testing
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Buck, Jacalyn, PhD, MS, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:Ohio State University
Title:Director
Contact Address:Department of Nursing, 5744 Bonaly Court, Dublin, OH, 43016, USA
Contact Telephone:614-293-4371
Co-Authors:Theresa Skybo, PhD, MS, BSN, PNP, Assistant Professor
Significance: In recent years, there has been an increased emphasis on standardized testing as a means to quantify educational outcomes in school-age children. It has been suggested that students may experience illness and increased level of stress as a result of this "high stakes testing". Theoretical framework/Purpose: Based on Lazarus' theory of stress/coping and Selye's theory of stress, the purpose of this study was to examine children's appraisal and response to proficiency testing. Specific aim: Characterize changes over the school year in students' appraisal of proficiency testing and stress hormone levels. Method/Design: A longitudinal, repeated measure design was used in a convenience sample of 56 children in an urban school setting. Data were collected via one open-ended question, (appraisal of testing), one self-report instrument (appraisal of stress), and salivary cortisol. The study was approved by The Ohio State University IRB. Results: Children's initial appraisal (time point 1) of proficiency tests included feeling nervous, fear of failing, feeling uncertain, it was too hard. At the time of testing (time point 3) children expressed fear of failing, but most stated that they were not stressed. There was a significant time effect of children's appraisal of stress (F [3,80.2] =21.47, p <.001). Stress levels (mean and standard deviation) were highest during time point 1 (3.98 + 2.6) and decreased significantly to time point 4 (1.33 + 2.04). There was no significant time effect for salivary cortisol response to proficiency testing. Conclusion: Children appraised proficiency testing as stressful at the beginning of the school year; however this stress decreased throughout the school year. Perhaps setting realistic expectations about proficiency testing and teaching children to cope with stressors at the beginning of the school year will facilitate an earlier decrease in this reported stressor, thus decreasing the possibility of physical and psychological illness. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleChildren's Appraisal and Response to Fourth Grade Proficiency Testingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158555-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Children's Appraisal and Response to Fourth Grade Proficiency Testing</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Buck, Jacalyn, PhD, MS, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Ohio State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Nursing, 5744 Bonaly Court, Dublin, OH, 43016, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">614-293-4371</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">buck-1@medctr.osu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Theresa Skybo, PhD, MS, BSN, PNP, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Significance: In recent years, there has been an increased emphasis on standardized testing as a means to quantify educational outcomes in school-age children. It has been suggested that students may experience illness and increased level of stress as a result of this &quot;high stakes testing&quot;. Theoretical framework/Purpose: Based on Lazarus' theory of stress/coping and Selye's theory of stress, the purpose of this study was to examine children's appraisal and response to proficiency testing. Specific aim: Characterize changes over the school year in students' appraisal of proficiency testing and stress hormone levels. Method/Design: A longitudinal, repeated measure design was used in a convenience sample of 56 children in an urban school setting. Data were collected via one open-ended question, (appraisal of testing), one self-report instrument (appraisal of stress), and salivary cortisol. The study was approved by The Ohio State University IRB. Results: Children's initial appraisal (time point 1) of proficiency tests included feeling nervous, fear of failing, feeling uncertain, it was too hard. At the time of testing (time point 3) children expressed fear of failing, but most stated that they were not stressed. There was a significant time effect of children's appraisal of stress (F [3,80.2] =21.47, p &lt;.001). Stress levels (mean and standard deviation) were highest during time point 1 (3.98 + 2.6) and decreased significantly to time point 4 (1.33 + 2.04). There was no significant time effect for salivary cortisol response to proficiency testing. Conclusion: Children appraised proficiency testing as stressful at the beginning of the school year; however this stress decreased throughout the school year. Perhaps setting realistic expectations about proficiency testing and teaching children to cope with stressors at the beginning of the school year will facilitate an earlier decrease in this reported stressor, thus decreasing the possibility of physical and psychological illness. [Poster Presentation]<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:10:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:10:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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