Feasibility of relaxing music to interrupt the stress response in patients receiving mechanical ventilatory support

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158556
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Feasibility of relaxing music to interrupt the stress response in patients receiving mechanical ventilatory support
Abstract:
Feasibility of relaxing music to interrupt the stress response in patients receiving mechanical ventilatory support
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Chlan, Linda, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 5-160 WDH 308 Harvard St. SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA
Contact Telephone:612-624-6658
Non-pharmacologic interventions such as relaxing music have been suggested as effective means for interrupting the stress response (SR) in mechanically ventilated ICU patients (MVPs) who experience profound stress with this treatment. Previous investigations have focused solely on indirect indicators of SR activity in the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) only. There is an absence of research measuring direct serum markers of activity in both the HPA axis and SNS. The purpose of this study was to test whether relaxing music can influence serum markers of activity in both arms of the SR and to determine the feasibility of collecting serum samples in MVPs. A two group experimental design with repeated measures pilot study was conducted based on psychophysiologic responses of humans to music. Ten (6 female, 4 male) alert, hemodynamically stable MVPs (mean age 64.9 + 8.2) were recruited from one university-based ICU in the urban Midwest. Subjects were randomized to 60 minutes of listening to self-selected relaxing music through headphones or to resting quietly for 60 minutes. Serum samples were readily attainable from all subjects via a central venous catheter at baseline, +15 minutes, +30 minutes, +60 minutes, and were assayed for epinephrine, norepinephrine, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and cortisol. Data analysis via Kruskal-Wallis and Friedman test revealed no significant differences between groups for any measures due to the small sample size and wide variability among subjects. Data trends indicate that music may reduce activity in both arms of the SR with a generalized pattern of reductions in all measures for the experimental group, while the control group demonstrated a variable pattern of increases and decreases over the study period. Further research is warranted with an adequately powered sample size to further build the conceptual basis of music intervention for stress reduction for the ultimate goal of producing positive outcomes for MVPs. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFeasibility of relaxing music to interrupt the stress response in patients receiving mechanical ventilatory supporten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158556-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Feasibility of relaxing music to interrupt the stress response in patients receiving mechanical ventilatory support</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Chlan, Linda, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 5-160 WDH 308 Harvard St. SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">612-624-6658</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">chlan001@umn.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Non-pharmacologic interventions such as relaxing music have been suggested as effective means for interrupting the stress response (SR) in mechanically ventilated ICU patients (MVPs) who experience profound stress with this treatment. Previous investigations have focused solely on indirect indicators of SR activity in the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) only. There is an absence of research measuring direct serum markers of activity in both the HPA axis and SNS. The purpose of this study was to test whether relaxing music can influence serum markers of activity in both arms of the SR and to determine the feasibility of collecting serum samples in MVPs. A two group experimental design with repeated measures pilot study was conducted based on psychophysiologic responses of humans to music. Ten (6 female, 4 male) alert, hemodynamically stable MVPs (mean age 64.9 + 8.2) were recruited from one university-based ICU in the urban Midwest. Subjects were randomized to 60 minutes of listening to self-selected relaxing music through headphones or to resting quietly for 60 minutes. Serum samples were readily attainable from all subjects via a central venous catheter at baseline, +15 minutes, +30 minutes, +60 minutes, and were assayed for epinephrine, norepinephrine, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and cortisol. Data analysis via Kruskal-Wallis and Friedman test revealed no significant differences between groups for any measures due to the small sample size and wide variability among subjects. Data trends indicate that music may reduce activity in both arms of the SR with a generalized pattern of reductions in all measures for the experimental group, while the control group demonstrated a variable pattern of increases and decreases over the study period. Further research is warranted with an adequately powered sample size to further build the conceptual basis of music intervention for stress reduction for the ultimate goal of producing positive outcomes for MVPs. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:10:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:10:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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