2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158560
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cross Cultural Perspective on Dignified Dying
Abstract:
Cross Cultural Perspective on Dignified Dying
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Doorenbos, Ardith, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Michigan State University
Title:Post Doctoral Fellow
Contact Address:College of Nursing, B418 West Fee Hall, East Lansing, MI, 48824, USA
Contact Telephone:248/477/6960
Co-Authors:Amy Coenen, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Professor and Sarah A Wilson, PhD, RN
Purpose: Cross cultural examination of concepts is required to contribute to ongoing development of the International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP«). The purpose of this study was to examine the reliability and validity of dignified dying characteristics among practicing nurses in U.S., India, and Northeast Africa. Conceptual model: The Dignity-Conserving Care Model was used to guide this study. The model suggests that perceptions of dignity at end-of-life are related to three themes: illness-related concerns, a dignity-conserving repertoire, and a social dignity inventory. Subjects: This descriptive study used a convenience sample of nurses who had cared for dying patients in the U.S. (n = 281), India (n = 229) and in Northeast Africa (n = 50). Methods: Nurses were recruited to complete a survey in either English or Hindi. The survey included demographic, open-ended questions, and a 14 item dignified dying scale of Likert-like items. Content validity was analyzed using the Diagnostic Content Validity (DCV) model. Construct validity was analyzed using Principal Axis factoring. Results: The 14 dignified dying items reliably measured dignified dying, Cronbach's alpha of 0.91. Content validity scores for the 14 items ranged from 0.62 to 0.77, indicating that all items were rated as characteristic of the dignified dying concept. Factor analysis yielded a 2-factor solution, which accounted for 53% of the variance. Conclusions: Unlike the proposed model indicting three themes, a two factor structure was found. Items representing Illness-related concerns were one factor, while both the dignity-conserving repertoire and social dignity inventory items represented the other. These results contribute to an understanding of dignified dying as a nursing concept worldwide. Additionally, the results of this study were submitted to the International Council of Nurses for ongoing development of the ICNP« concept of dignified dying.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCross Cultural Perspective on Dignified Dyingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158560-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cross Cultural Perspective on Dignified Dying</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Doorenbos, Ardith, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Michigan State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Post Doctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, B418 West Fee Hall, East Lansing, MI, 48824, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">248/477/6960</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ardith.doorenbos@hc.msu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Amy Coenen, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Professor and Sarah A Wilson, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Cross cultural examination of concepts is required to contribute to ongoing development of the International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP&laquo;). The purpose of this study was to examine the reliability and validity of dignified dying characteristics among practicing nurses in U.S., India, and Northeast Africa. Conceptual model: The Dignity-Conserving Care Model was used to guide this study. The model suggests that perceptions of dignity at end-of-life are related to three themes: illness-related concerns, a dignity-conserving repertoire, and a social dignity inventory. Subjects: This descriptive study used a convenience sample of nurses who had cared for dying patients in the U.S. (n = 281), India (n = 229) and in Northeast Africa (n = 50). Methods: Nurses were recruited to complete a survey in either English or Hindi. The survey included demographic, open-ended questions, and a 14 item dignified dying scale of Likert-like items. Content validity was analyzed using the Diagnostic Content Validity (DCV) model. Construct validity was analyzed using Principal Axis factoring. Results: The 14 dignified dying items reliably measured dignified dying, Cronbach's alpha of 0.91. Content validity scores for the 14 items ranged from 0.62 to 0.77, indicating that all items were rated as characteristic of the dignified dying concept. Factor analysis yielded a 2-factor solution, which accounted for 53% of the variance. Conclusions: Unlike the proposed model indicting three themes, a two factor structure was found. Items representing Illness-related concerns were one factor, while both the dignity-conserving repertoire and social dignity inventory items represented the other. These results contribute to an understanding of dignified dying as a nursing concept worldwide. Additionally, the results of this study were submitted to the International Council of Nurses for ongoing development of the ICNP&laquo; concept of dignified dying.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:10:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:10:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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