Immigrant South Asian Muslim Women's Experience of Accessing Perinatal Health Care

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158562
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Immigrant South Asian Muslim Women's Experience of Accessing Perinatal Health Care
Abstract:
Immigrant South Asian Muslim Women's Experience of Accessing Perinatal Health Care
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Gulzar, Laila, PhD, MSN, MPH
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:5-160 Weaver Densford Hall (Nursing Department ), 308 Harvard St. SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA
Contact Telephone:612-624-2425
Five to eight million Muslims constitute one of the fastest growing minority groups in the U.S. However, no U.S.-based research data were found in the published literature on health needs and health services access of Muslims. Barriers to immigrants' access to adequate health care include economics, unawareness about how to use the system, linguistic and cultural issues, and lack of trust and cultural sensitivity. Current health services access surveys fail to consider consumers' experiences and contextual factors such as cultural norms and values and interactions with care systems. This qualitative study sought to explore South Asian Muslim immigrant women's experiences of accessing perinatal health care in Minnesota. Data were collected through phone interviews and two focus group discussions of 8 immigrant women from Pakistan, recruited by convenience sampling method. Data were translated from Urdu to English, transcribed, and analyzed for major content themes and descriptive statistics. University of Minnesota's Human Subjects Committee reviewed the study. Eight young women, who migrated to the U.S. from Pakistan in the last 5 years participated. All women reported having adequate health insurance and prenatal care. However, some barriers encountered by other minorities, including gaps in receiving client-centered, culturally-relevant care were expressed. Definite cultural preference for female providers was articulated for Ob/Gyn services and unavailability of female providers was associated with dissatisfaction with services. Provider characteristics such as taking time to listen, explain, and answer questions; open communication; and reassurance for positive outcomes were most valued. Women recommended improvement in consumer education, need for better understanding of clients' cultural and religious origins and preferences, and provisions for more female providers. The findings of the study underscore the need of nurses' continued advocacy for improved health services for the immigrants and further in-depth studies of access issues for this population.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImmigrant South Asian Muslim Women's Experience of Accessing Perinatal Health Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158562-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Immigrant South Asian Muslim Women's Experience of Accessing Perinatal Health Care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gulzar, Laila, PhD, MSN, MPH</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5-160 Weaver Densford Hall (Nursing Department ), 308 Harvard St. SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">612-624-2425</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">gulza002@umn.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Five to eight million Muslims constitute one of the fastest growing minority groups in the U.S. However, no U.S.-based research data were found in the published literature on health needs and health services access of Muslims. Barriers to immigrants' access to adequate health care include economics, unawareness about how to use the system, linguistic and cultural issues, and lack of trust and cultural sensitivity. Current health services access surveys fail to consider consumers' experiences and contextual factors such as cultural norms and values and interactions with care systems. This qualitative study sought to explore South Asian Muslim immigrant women's experiences of accessing perinatal health care in Minnesota. Data were collected through phone interviews and two focus group discussions of 8 immigrant women from Pakistan, recruited by convenience sampling method. Data were translated from Urdu to English, transcribed, and analyzed for major content themes and descriptive statistics. University of Minnesota's Human Subjects Committee reviewed the study. Eight young women, who migrated to the U.S. from Pakistan in the last 5 years participated. All women reported having adequate health insurance and prenatal care. However, some barriers encountered by other minorities, including gaps in receiving client-centered, culturally-relevant care were expressed. Definite cultural preference for female providers was articulated for Ob/Gyn services and unavailability of female providers was associated with dissatisfaction with services. Provider characteristics such as taking time to listen, explain, and answer questions; open communication; and reassurance for positive outcomes were most valued. Women recommended improvement in consumer education, need for better understanding of clients' cultural and religious origins and preferences, and provisions for more female providers. The findings of the study underscore the need of nurses' continued advocacy for improved health services for the immigrants and further in-depth studies of access issues for this population.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:10:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:10:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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