2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158563
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cultural Relevance of a Stress and Coping Intervention Among Refugee Women
Abstract:
Cultural Relevance of a Stress and Coping Intervention Among Refugee Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Halcon, Linda, PhD, MPH, BSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:5-160 Weaver Densford Hall (SON), 308 Harvard St. SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA
Contact Telephone:612-626-6450
Co-Authors:Cheryl L. Robertson, PhD, MPH, RN, Assistant Professor; Bharti M. Jindal, BA, Research Assistant; and Karen A. Monsen, PhD(c), MS, RN, Predoctoral Student
Purpose: Refugees who have survived trauma often suffer from psychosocial problems. Access to conventional mental health services is limited and may not be accepted. This pilot study tested the feasibility and acceptability of an innovative stress and coping intervention, Health Realization, among Somali and Oromo (Ethiopian) women refugees. Theoretical Framework: Health Realization is a strengths-based stress and coping intervention to promote and enhance the use of internal and external coping resources and thus decrease the negative outcomes of stress. Subjects: Two separate groups of Somali (n=9) and Oromo (n=10) refugee women with histories of trauma or torture and previously identified psychosocial problems. Methods: Eight weekly educational sessions were provided to two groups of women in a community setting. Transportation and a stipend for childcare and other expenses were provided. Program content and materials were translated and adapted for each group. Brief session evaluation questionnaires were completed at the end of each session addressing participant understanding and cultural relevance of the materials and content. Post-intervention focus groups were conducted to obtain more in-depth evaluative data. Results: Post-session questionnaire results suggested that all topics included in the program were considered relevant within participants' cultures. During post-intervention focus groups, women in both ethnic groups verbalized many examples of using the material in their day-to-day lives. Lack of transportation and childcare were identified as the most important barriers for future intervention groups. Conclusions: Health Realization principles and concepts, with translation and minor modifications, appear to provide a promising stress and coping intervention for Somali and Oromo refugee women when used in community settings. Results of this pilot study suggest that it is both feasible and acceptable. Transportation and some provision for childcare are necessary in these populations of refugee women.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCultural Relevance of a Stress and Coping Intervention Among Refugee Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158563-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cultural Relevance of a Stress and Coping Intervention Among Refugee Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Halcon, Linda, PhD, MPH, BSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5-160 Weaver Densford Hall (SON), 308 Harvard St. SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">612-626-6450</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">halco001@umn.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Cheryl L. Robertson, PhD, MPH, RN, Assistant Professor; Bharti M. Jindal, BA, Research Assistant; and Karen A. Monsen, PhD(c), MS, RN, Predoctoral Student</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Refugees who have survived trauma often suffer from psychosocial problems. Access to conventional mental health services is limited and may not be accepted. This pilot study tested the feasibility and acceptability of an innovative stress and coping intervention, Health Realization, among Somali and Oromo (Ethiopian) women refugees. Theoretical Framework: Health Realization is a strengths-based stress and coping intervention to promote and enhance the use of internal and external coping resources and thus decrease the negative outcomes of stress. Subjects: Two separate groups of Somali (n=9) and Oromo (n=10) refugee women with histories of trauma or torture and previously identified psychosocial problems. Methods: Eight weekly educational sessions were provided to two groups of women in a community setting. Transportation and a stipend for childcare and other expenses were provided. Program content and materials were translated and adapted for each group. Brief session evaluation questionnaires were completed at the end of each session addressing participant understanding and cultural relevance of the materials and content. Post-intervention focus groups were conducted to obtain more in-depth evaluative data. Results: Post-session questionnaire results suggested that all topics included in the program were considered relevant within participants' cultures. During post-intervention focus groups, women in both ethnic groups verbalized many examples of using the material in their day-to-day lives. Lack of transportation and childcare were identified as the most important barriers for future intervention groups. Conclusions: Health Realization principles and concepts, with translation and minor modifications, appear to provide a promising stress and coping intervention for Somali and Oromo refugee women when used in community settings. Results of this pilot study suggest that it is both feasible and acceptable. Transportation and some provision for childcare are necessary in these populations of refugee women.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:10:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:10:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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