Student and Faculty Perceptions of Nursing Education Culture and its Impact on Minority Students

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158566
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Student and Faculty Perceptions of Nursing Education Culture and its Impact on Minority Students
Abstract:
Student and Faculty Perceptions of Nursing Education Culture and its Impact on Minority Students
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Kossman, Susan, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Illinois State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, campus Box 5810, Normal, IL, 61790, USA
Contact Telephone:309 438-2553
Increasing the number of minority nurses can help address the nursing shortage and nursing's failure to reflect the nations' growing ethnic and racial diversity. Despite numerous efforts over many years, minority nursing students remain underrepresented, have more academic difficulty and higher attrition rates. It may be helpful to investigate this problem from another viewpoint - that of cultural fit. Student retention theory blended with culture theory offers a conceptual framework suggesting that schools' climates and cultures affect students' academic performance. The purpose of this descriptive qualitative study was to investigate minority persistence in nursing education from a cultural viewpoint, looking at the impact of higher education and nursing education culture and role of nursing faculty. Twenty-nine white and African-American pre-licensure nursing students and 14 faculty participated in focus group and individual interviews. Open coding and cross-case comparisons (by role, race, and geographic location) resulted in formulation of a concept map describing the nursing student experience. Key findings were: universal perception of struggle in nursing education; pervasive and negative impact of racial prejudice on black students' experience; positive impact of welcoming actions and negative impact of unwelcoming actions by faculty, students and administrators on student success; need for welcoming by all three groups in the nursing program; conflict between nursing education's values and norms or typical behaviors of nurse educators; key role of fellow students and faculty in influencing minority student success

The study indicates that nursing education culture influences students' success. Students connect with nursing values and find value-driven actions welcoming while norm-driven actions create barriers. Implications for administrators include maintaining program emphasis on nursing values, creating a "culture of comfort" through transition and support programs, and socializing all students into nursing values. Faculty implications include increased awareness of actions and importance of modeling values.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStudent and Faculty Perceptions of Nursing Education Culture and its Impact on Minority Studentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158566-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Student and Faculty Perceptions of Nursing Education Culture and its Impact on Minority Students</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kossman, Susan, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Illinois State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, campus Box 5810, Normal, IL, 61790, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">309 438-2553</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">skossm@ilstu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Increasing the number of minority nurses can help address the nursing shortage and nursing's failure to reflect the nations' growing ethnic and racial diversity. Despite numerous efforts over many years, minority nursing students remain underrepresented, have more academic difficulty and higher attrition rates. It may be helpful to investigate this problem from another viewpoint - that of cultural fit. Student retention theory blended with culture theory offers a conceptual framework suggesting that schools' climates and cultures affect students' academic performance. The purpose of this descriptive qualitative study was to investigate minority persistence in nursing education from a cultural viewpoint, looking at the impact of higher education and nursing education culture and role of nursing faculty. Twenty-nine white and African-American pre-licensure nursing students and 14 faculty participated in focus group and individual interviews. Open coding and cross-case comparisons (by role, race, and geographic location) resulted in formulation of a concept map describing the nursing student experience. Key findings were: universal perception of struggle in nursing education; pervasive and negative impact of racial prejudice on black students' experience; positive impact of welcoming actions and negative impact of unwelcoming actions by faculty, students and administrators on student success; need for welcoming by all three groups in the nursing program; conflict between nursing education's values and norms or typical behaviors of nurse educators; key role of fellow students and faculty in influencing minority student success<br/><br/>The study indicates that nursing education culture influences students' success. Students connect with nursing values and find value-driven actions welcoming while norm-driven actions create barriers. Implications for administrators include maintaining program emphasis on nursing values, creating a &quot;culture of comfort&quot; through transition and support programs, and socializing all students into nursing values. Faculty implications include increased awareness of actions and importance of modeling values.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:10:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:10:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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