2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158571
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Transition to Parenthood and Early Parenting of High-Risk Multiple Birth Families
Abstract:
Transition to Parenthood and Early Parenting of High-Risk Multiple Birth Families
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Lutz, Kristin, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin - Madison
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:SON - K6/354 Clinical Science Center, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI, 53792-2455, USA
Contact Telephone:608-265-2190
The purpose of this study was to explore and describe the experiences, trajectory, and context of high-risk multiple birth (MB) families. The specific aims were to: 1) Describe the experience of high-risk MB pregnancy and parenting from the perspective of MB parents; 2) Collect background data and participant recommendations for future study. This study used a retrospective, qualitative descriptive design. The sample included 20 parents with a high-risk MB pregnancy (i.e., maternal or fetal prenatal medical complications or preterm birth) that occurred within the past 5 years. During two, 1 - 2 hour-long interviews, participants shared their experiences and perspectives of high-risk parenting during pregnancy, acute Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) hospitalization, and the first year. High-risk MB parents found the transition to parenthood rewarding, and also challenging and stressful. Isolation, fear, depression, and financial concerns were described by mothers and fathers, while work disruption and extended medical or family leave were more commonly maternal experiences. Parents were grateful for medical technology and the technical skills of health professionals, but found the NICU environment highly stressful - particularly when infants were medically unstable or health professionals were perceived as unsupportive or judgmental. The first year of parenting was a blur, characterized by sleep deprivation, numerous visits to health professionals, and balancing of the demands of parenting multiple infants - some with special health care needs - with other roles and responsibilities. Mothers often spent considerable time advocating for their infants and coordinating health care activities and insurance. Study findings suggest that parenting two or more high-risk MB infants was demanding and difficult, but parents' psychosocial and educational needs were often unmet by health care professionals. Having a child or children with special health care needs compounded MB parenting stress and challenges, as did discontinuity of care and inadequate communication between health professionals and parents. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTransition to Parenthood and Early Parenting of High-Risk Multiple Birth Familiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158571-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Transition to Parenthood and Early Parenting of High-Risk Multiple Birth Families</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lutz, Kristin, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin - Madison</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON - K6/354 Clinical Science Center, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI, 53792-2455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">608-265-2190</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kflutz@wisc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to explore and describe the experiences, trajectory, and context of high-risk multiple birth (MB) families. The specific aims were to: 1) Describe the experience of high-risk MB pregnancy and parenting from the perspective of MB parents; 2) Collect background data and participant recommendations for future study. This study used a retrospective, qualitative descriptive design. The sample included 20 parents with a high-risk MB pregnancy (i.e., maternal or fetal prenatal medical complications or preterm birth) that occurred within the past 5 years. During two, 1 - 2 hour-long interviews, participants shared their experiences and perspectives of high-risk parenting during pregnancy, acute Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) hospitalization, and the first year. High-risk MB parents found the transition to parenthood rewarding, and also challenging and stressful. Isolation, fear, depression, and financial concerns were described by mothers and fathers, while work disruption and extended medical or family leave were more commonly maternal experiences. Parents were grateful for medical technology and the technical skills of health professionals, but found the NICU environment highly stressful - particularly when infants were medically unstable or health professionals were perceived as unsupportive or judgmental. The first year of parenting was a blur, characterized by sleep deprivation, numerous visits to health professionals, and balancing of the demands of parenting multiple infants - some with special health care needs - with other roles and responsibilities. Mothers often spent considerable time advocating for their infants and coordinating health care activities and insurance. Study findings suggest that parenting two or more high-risk MB infants was demanding and difficult, but parents' psychosocial and educational needs were often unmet by health care professionals. Having a child or children with special health care needs compounded MB parenting stress and challenges, as did discontinuity of care and inadequate communication between health professionals and parents. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:11:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:11:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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