2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158572
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Psychosocial Adaptation of Children with Epilepsy and Low IQ
Abstract:
Psychosocial Adaptation of Children with Epilepsy and Low IQ
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Buelow, Janice
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University
Title:Post Doctoral Fellow
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 1111 Middle Drive, NU 132, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA
Contact Telephone:317.274.9639
Children with epilepsy commonly exhibit behavior problems and academic underachievement. Children with a low IQ (i.e., IQ 60-85) are also at high risk for academic problems. However, the problems of children who have both epilepsy and a low IQ are not well understood. The pilot study was embedded within a larger longitudinal study being conducted by Dr. Joan Austin to identify predictors of psychosocial adaptation in children with epilepsy. In the sample of 169 children with epilepsy, 40 had IQs between 60 and 85. The specific purpose of the proposed pilot study was to describe children mental health outcomes (behavior problems, self-concept and depression) among children with low IQ (60 - 85), Mid IQ (85 - 100) and High IQ ( > 100). The CBCL, Piers-Harris Self Concept Scale, and the CDI measured child behavior, child self-concept and depression respectively. Children with low IQ differed from children with high IQ in total behavior problems score (p=.0083). In addition, children with low IQ experienced more social problems (p=.0003) and more attention problems (p=.0005) than children with high IQ. Children with mid IQ did not differ from children with high IQ in total behavior problems but did experience more social problems ( p=.02) and more attention problems (p=.01) than children with high IQ. There were no significant behavior differences between children with low and mid IQ. Children with low IQ also reported a poorer self-concept (p=.0022) and more depression (p=.001) than children with high IQ. This study suggests that children with low IQ experience problems with behavior, self-concept and depression. Further research is necessary to describe the specific problems of children with low IQ and epilepsy.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePsychosocial Adaptation of Children with Epilepsy and Low IQen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158572-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Psychosocial Adaptation of Children with Epilepsy and Low IQ</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Buelow, Janice</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Post Doctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 1111 Middle Drive, NU 132, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">317.274.9639</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jbuelow@iupui.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Children with epilepsy commonly exhibit behavior problems and academic underachievement. Children with a low IQ (i.e., IQ 60-85) are also at high risk for academic problems. However, the problems of children who have both epilepsy and a low IQ are not well understood. The pilot study was embedded within a larger longitudinal study being conducted by Dr. Joan Austin to identify predictors of psychosocial adaptation in children with epilepsy. In the sample of 169 children with epilepsy, 40 had IQs between 60 and 85. The specific purpose of the proposed pilot study was to describe children mental health outcomes (behavior problems, self-concept and depression) among children with low IQ (60 - 85), Mid IQ (85 - 100) and High IQ ( &gt; 100). The CBCL, Piers-Harris Self Concept Scale, and the CDI measured child behavior, child self-concept and depression respectively. Children with low IQ differed from children with high IQ in total behavior problems score (p=.0083). In addition, children with low IQ experienced more social problems (p=.0003) and more attention problems (p=.0005) than children with high IQ. Children with mid IQ did not differ from children with high IQ in total behavior problems but did experience more social problems ( p=.02) and more attention problems (p=.01) than children with high IQ. There were no significant behavior differences between children with low and mid IQ. Children with low IQ also reported a poorer self-concept (p=.0022) and more depression (p=.001) than children with high IQ. This study suggests that children with low IQ experience problems with behavior, self-concept and depression. Further research is necessary to describe the specific problems of children with low IQ and epilepsy.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:11:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:11:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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