2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158573
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Aesthetic Analysis of Images of Nursing
Abstract:
Aesthetic Analysis of Images of Nursing
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Decker, Sally
P.I. Institution Name:Saginaw Valley State University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:Lange College of Nursing & Health Sciences, 7400 Bay Road, University Center, MI, 48710, USA
Contact Telephone:989.964.4908
Photographs capturing "nursing" created by ten semesters of nursing graduate students (N=150 students and N=255 photographs) were analyzed to uncover the themes represented in these visual metaphors. The study used Nightingale's conceptualization of nursing as a fine art, Carper's concept of aesthetic knowing, and John Szarkowski's conceptualization of mirror/window photographs. Photographs were taken as part of a class focusing on nursing knowledge development following an explanation of modern photographic technique. Students gave permission for their photographs to be included in the study. Aesthetic analysis was used and photographs were coded for image, shape, student comments about meaning, and latent image. Five major themes emerged from the analysis. Nursing was captured in these images as: 1) skilled, knowledgeable doing to protect and guide using communication and teamwork; 2) complexity of care; 3) growing, building of tradition; 4) struggling and transcending through strength; and 5) growing, building of tradition. Both mirror and window photographs were created. Students captured nursing as an embodied activity, a profession, and a way of being in the world.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAesthetic Analysis of Images of Nursingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158573-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Aesthetic Analysis of Images of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Decker, Sally</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Saginaw Valley State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Lange College of Nursing &amp; Health Sciences, 7400 Bay Road, University Center, MI, 48710, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">989.964.4908</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">decker@svsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Photographs capturing &quot;nursing&quot; created by ten semesters of nursing graduate students (N=150 students and N=255 photographs) were analyzed to uncover the themes represented in these visual metaphors. The study used Nightingale's conceptualization of nursing as a fine art, Carper's concept of aesthetic knowing, and John Szarkowski's conceptualization of mirror/window photographs. Photographs were taken as part of a class focusing on nursing knowledge development following an explanation of modern photographic technique. Students gave permission for their photographs to be included in the study. Aesthetic analysis was used and photographs were coded for image, shape, student comments about meaning, and latent image. Five major themes emerged from the analysis. Nursing was captured in these images as: 1) skilled, knowledgeable doing to protect and guide using communication and teamwork; 2) complexity of care; 3) growing, building of tradition; 4) struggling and transcending through strength; and 5) growing, building of tradition. Both mirror and window photographs were created. Students captured nursing as an embodied activity, a profession, and a way of being in the world.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:11:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:11:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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