2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158575
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Coping Strategies and Quality of Life in Women with Advanced Breast Cancer
Abstract:
Coping Strategies and Quality of Life in Women with Advanced Breast Cancer
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Northouse, Laurel, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls Building, 4346 SNB, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA
Contact Telephone:734.615.4016
Coping with advanced breast cancer is a major challenge for both women and their family members. However, little is known about the coping strategies they use or whether certain coping strategies are associated with better quality of life. The purpose of this study was to: 1) identify the coping strategies used by women and family members, 2) determine if they differed in types of coping strategies they used, and 3) determine which coping strategies were related to higher quality of life. Stress-coping theory guided this exploratory study. The sample consisted of 189 patient-family member dyads who entered the study within one month after learning that cancer had progressed. Coping was measured with the Brief COPE and quality of life was measured with the SF-36 and FACT B. Each instrument has acceptable reliability and validity. Results indicated that women used acceptance and emotional support most often, and denial, behavioral disengagement (giving up), and alcohol use least often. Family members used acceptance and active coping most often and behavioral disengagement least often. Significant differences were found between the coping strategies used by patients and family members. Patients reported greater use of emotional support, religion, and distraction while family members reported greater use of alcohol. The coping strategies accounted for 42% of the variance women's overall quality of life, F(12,176)=10.62, p<.001, and 28% of the variance in family members' quality of life, F(12,176)=5.79, p<.001. Women who used more acceptance, more distraction, less denial, less behavioral disengagement, and less venting of negative feelings reported higher quality of life. Family members who used more religion, less denial, and less alcohol reported higher quality of life. Nursing implications include fostering the use of effective coping strategies by both patients and family members and helping them to negotiate differences in their coping styles.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCoping Strategies and Quality of Life in Women with Advanced Breast Canceren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158575-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Coping Strategies and Quality of Life in Women with Advanced Breast Cancer</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Northouse, Laurel, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls Building, 4346 SNB, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734.615.4016</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lnortho@umich.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Coping with advanced breast cancer is a major challenge for both women and their family members. However, little is known about the coping strategies they use or whether certain coping strategies are associated with better quality of life. The purpose of this study was to: 1) identify the coping strategies used by women and family members, 2) determine if they differed in types of coping strategies they used, and 3) determine which coping strategies were related to higher quality of life. Stress-coping theory guided this exploratory study. The sample consisted of 189 patient-family member dyads who entered the study within one month after learning that cancer had progressed. Coping was measured with the Brief COPE and quality of life was measured with the SF-36 and FACT B. Each instrument has acceptable reliability and validity. Results indicated that women used acceptance and emotional support most often, and denial, behavioral disengagement (giving up), and alcohol use least often. Family members used acceptance and active coping most often and behavioral disengagement least often. Significant differences were found between the coping strategies used by patients and family members. Patients reported greater use of emotional support, religion, and distraction while family members reported greater use of alcohol. The coping strategies accounted for 42% of the variance women's overall quality of life, F(12,176)=10.62, p&lt;.001, and 28% of the variance in family members' quality of life, F(12,176)=5.79, p&lt;.001. Women who used more acceptance, more distraction, less denial, less behavioral disengagement, and less venting of negative feelings reported higher quality of life. Family members who used more religion, less denial, and less alcohol reported higher quality of life. Nursing implications include fostering the use of effective coping strategies by both patients and family members and helping them to negotiate differences in their coping styles.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:11:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:11:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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