2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158576
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Decision Making and Health in Families with Medically-Fragile Children
Abstract:
Decision Making and Health in Families with Medically-Fragile Children
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Brannan, Jo, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:MacMurray College
Title:Director and Associate Professor
Contact Address:Department of Nursing, 447 East College Avenue, Jacksonville, IL, 62650, USA
Contact Telephone:217.479.7083
An increasing number of chronically ill children who previously would have died or been institutionalized are now surviving and relying on daily nursing care at home. These changes are, in large part, due to technological advances and improvements in diagnosis and treatment. In most cases, parents are taking these children home to assume most of the responsibility and decision making for their care. Since decision making has long been considered an important aspect of family health, promotion of decision-making skills could lead to a higher level of health for these families and decrease their use of health care services. The purpose of this descriptive, correlational study was to examine the relationship between decision making and family health. The decisional conflicts encountered by families with medically-fragile children were identified, as well as the extent to which decisional conflict and decision self-efficacy influence the family's health. The purposive sample included 109 parents who completed Decisional Conflict Scale, Decision Self-Efficacy Scale, and Family Assessment Device. Descriptive analysis revealed that the types of decisions that had confronted these families primarily involved surgical decisions, decisions about changing health care providers or facilities, and decisions about the type of medical treatment. Pearson r correlations identified an inverse relationship between decisional conflict and decision self-efficacy, an inverse relationship between decisional conflict and family health, and a positive relationship between decision self-efficacy and family health. Hierarchical regression analysis supported the hypothesis that family health was significantly influenced by the amount of decisional conflict and decision self-efficacy experienced by parents, after controlling for illness duration and parental marital status, income, and education. This study expands on the knowledge base related to families with medically-fragile children and provides the groundwork for development of family-focused decision support interventions and further research into this area.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDecision Making and Health in Families with Medically-Fragile Childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158576-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Decision Making and Health in Families with Medically-Fragile Children</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Brannan, Jo, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">MacMurray College</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director and Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Nursing, 447 East College Avenue, Jacksonville, IL, 62650, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">217.479.7083</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">joellenb@mac.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">An increasing number of chronically ill children who previously would have died or been institutionalized are now surviving and relying on daily nursing care at home. These changes are, in large part, due to technological advances and improvements in diagnosis and treatment. In most cases, parents are taking these children home to assume most of the responsibility and decision making for their care. Since decision making has long been considered an important aspect of family health, promotion of decision-making skills could lead to a higher level of health for these families and decrease their use of health care services. The purpose of this descriptive, correlational study was to examine the relationship between decision making and family health. The decisional conflicts encountered by families with medically-fragile children were identified, as well as the extent to which decisional conflict and decision self-efficacy influence the family's health. The purposive sample included 109 parents who completed Decisional Conflict Scale, Decision Self-Efficacy Scale, and Family Assessment Device. Descriptive analysis revealed that the types of decisions that had confronted these families primarily involved surgical decisions, decisions about changing health care providers or facilities, and decisions about the type of medical treatment. Pearson r correlations identified an inverse relationship between decisional conflict and decision self-efficacy, an inverse relationship between decisional conflict and family health, and a positive relationship between decision self-efficacy and family health. Hierarchical regression analysis supported the hypothesis that family health was significantly influenced by the amount of decisional conflict and decision self-efficacy experienced by parents, after controlling for illness duration and parental marital status, income, and education. This study expands on the knowledge base related to families with medically-fragile children and provides the groundwork for development of family-focused decision support interventions and further research into this area.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:11:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:11:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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