2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158580
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Dyadic Intervention for Men with Prostate Cancer
Abstract:
Dyadic Intervention for Men with Prostate Cancer
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Weber, Bryan
P.I. Institution Name:University of Florida
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, PO Box 100197, Gainesville, FL, 32610-0197, USA
Contact Telephone:352.392.3371
Side-effects related to radical prostatectomy (RP), the gold standard treatment for localized prostate cancer, include urinary and sexual dysfunctions that are known to lead to depression. Many cancer patients have found support groups effective at reducing depression but men typically do not participate in them. The purpose of this dissertation study was to test the effects of a dyadic intervention (one-to-one support) on social support (Modified Inventory of Socially Supportive Behaviors), self-efficacy (Stanford Inventory of Cancer Patient Adjustment), and depression (Geriatric Depression Scale). Men were randomized to control group (N=15; M age 59.7) and received usual care or experimental group (N=15; M age 57.5) and were paired (dyads) with a support partner who also had a RP and similar side-effects. The dyads met 8 times in 8 weeks (Mtime=60 minutes) to discuss emotions and concerns associated with survivorship. No significant differences were detected on social support, but after 8 weeks, there were significant differences on self-efficacy between controls and experimentals (Ms=309 and 314, respectively) and after both 4 weeks and 8 weeks there were significant differences between controls (Ms=1.7 and 2.1, respectively) and experimentals (Ms=0.3 and 0.4, respectively) on depression. Anecdotal data showed men favored dyadic intervention over support groups. hence, the dyadic intervention was a low cost strategy that was an acceptable means of support that effectively reduced depression and increased self-efficacy in men treated by RP.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDyadic Intervention for Men with Prostate Canceren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158580-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Dyadic Intervention for Men with Prostate Cancer</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Weber, Bryan</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Florida</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, PO Box 100197, Gainesville, FL, 32610-0197, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">352.392.3371</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bweber@ufl.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Side-effects related to radical prostatectomy (RP), the gold standard treatment for localized prostate cancer, include urinary and sexual dysfunctions that are known to lead to depression. Many cancer patients have found support groups effective at reducing depression but men typically do not participate in them. The purpose of this dissertation study was to test the effects of a dyadic intervention (one-to-one support) on social support (Modified Inventory of Socially Supportive Behaviors), self-efficacy (Stanford Inventory of Cancer Patient Adjustment), and depression (Geriatric Depression Scale). Men were randomized to control group (N=15; M age 59.7) and received usual care or experimental group (N=15; M age 57.5) and were paired (dyads) with a support partner who also had a RP and similar side-effects. The dyads met 8 times in 8 weeks (Mtime=60 minutes) to discuss emotions and concerns associated with survivorship. No significant differences were detected on social support, but after 8 weeks, there were significant differences on self-efficacy between controls and experimentals (Ms=309 and 314, respectively) and after both 4 weeks and 8 weeks there were significant differences between controls (Ms=1.7 and 2.1, respectively) and experimentals (Ms=0.3 and 0.4, respectively) on depression. Anecdotal data showed men favored dyadic intervention over support groups. hence, the dyadic intervention was a low cost strategy that was an acceptable means of support that effectively reduced depression and increased self-efficacy in men treated by RP.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:11:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:11:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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