2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158582
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Use of Complementary/Alternative Medicine (Cam) in Women with Breast Cancer
Abstract:
Use of Complementary/Alternative Medicine (Cam) in Women with Breast Cancer
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Bennett, Mary, DNS/DNSc/DSN
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana State University
Title:Assistant Dean
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 749 Chestnut Street, SN 311, Terre Haute, IN, 47809, USA
Contact Telephone:812.237.2320
Purpose: To document predictors of CAM use in women with breast cancer. Theoretical Framework: Theory of Reasoned Action was used to examine factors related to use of CAM. Sample: Predominantly Caucasian women with breast cancer from the Tampa Bay area and a rural Mid-western area (N=105). Methods: Subjects completed the "Use of Complementary Therapies Survey". Frequencies of use were calculated for each therapy. Logistic regression and least squares regression models were fit to identify independent predictors of CAM use. Results: Among diet and nutritional supplements, 64% of all participants reported regular use of vitamins/minerals, 33% regularly used anti-oxidants. Among stress-reducing techniques, 49% of all participants regularly used prayer and spiritual healing, followed by support groups (37%) and humor/laughter therapy (21%). Traditional/ethnic medicine therapies were rarely used with the exception of massage. In multivariable analysis, more frequent use of CAM therapy was observed among study participants who had undergone chemotherapy, and those with more education. In addition, being less satisfied with one's primary physician was associated with more frequent use of CAM. Fifty-one percent of participants notified their Health Care Providers of their CAM use. Participants in the rural setting spent an average of $20.78 per month on CAM. Rural participants rated Prayer/Spiritual Healing, Support Group, Humor/Laughter Therapy, Yoga/Meditation, Relaxation Techniques, and Anti-Oxidants the most effective CAM practices. Conclusions: Use of CAM therapies is common in this sample; however, its use varies significantly by demographic and clinical factors. It is important that Health Care Providers remain open to discussion of CAM use with their clients and have current information on CAM effectiveness, potential harmful effects and costs associated with CAM use.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUse of Complementary/Alternative Medicine (Cam) in Women with Breast Canceren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158582-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Use of Complementary/Alternative Medicine (Cam) in Women with Breast Cancer</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bennett, Mary, DNS/DNSc/DSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Dean</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 749 Chestnut Street, SN 311, Terre Haute, IN, 47809, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">812.237.2320</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">m-bennett@indstate.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To document predictors of CAM use in women with breast cancer. Theoretical Framework: Theory of Reasoned Action was used to examine factors related to use of CAM. Sample: Predominantly Caucasian women with breast cancer from the Tampa Bay area and a rural Mid-western area (N=105). Methods: Subjects completed the &quot;Use of Complementary Therapies Survey&quot;. Frequencies of use were calculated for each therapy. Logistic regression and least squares regression models were fit to identify independent predictors of CAM use. Results: Among diet and nutritional supplements, 64% of all participants reported regular use of vitamins/minerals, 33% regularly used anti-oxidants. Among stress-reducing techniques, 49% of all participants regularly used prayer and spiritual healing, followed by support groups (37%) and humor/laughter therapy (21%). Traditional/ethnic medicine therapies were rarely used with the exception of massage. In multivariable analysis, more frequent use of CAM therapy was observed among study participants who had undergone chemotherapy, and those with more education. In addition, being less satisfied with one's primary physician was associated with more frequent use of CAM. Fifty-one percent of participants notified their Health Care Providers of their CAM use. Participants in the rural setting spent an average of $20.78 per month on CAM. Rural participants rated Prayer/Spiritual Healing, Support Group, Humor/Laughter Therapy, Yoga/Meditation, Relaxation Techniques, and Anti-Oxidants the most effective CAM practices. Conclusions: Use of CAM therapies is common in this sample; however, its use varies significantly by demographic and clinical factors. It is important that Health Care Providers remain open to discussion of CAM use with their clients and have current information on CAM effectiveness, potential harmful effects and costs associated with CAM use.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:11:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:11:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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