2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158588
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Sleep Architecture and Sleep Complaints of Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea
Abstract:
Sleep Architecture and Sleep Complaints of Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Suen, Lee-Jen
P.I. Institution Name:University of Akron
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 209 Carroll Street, MGH 101, Akron, OH, 44325-3701, USA
Contact Telephone:330.972.5931
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep-related breathing disorder that can result in physical, psychological, and social disturbances. Patients' complaints typically arise from the chronic sleep disruption associated with OSA. However, without witnessed apnea, patients may not be aware of their problem. This study explores the relationship between the subjective sleep complaints and sleep architecture of patients with OSA. After reviewing sleep records originally collected for clinical purposes, 9 men and 9 women diagnosed with OSA were included in this study. Diagnosis and sleep architecture data were based on full-night polysomnographic study; sleep complaints were taken from a questionnaire. Patients were diagnosed with OSA if the number of apneas/hypopneas per hour of sleep (AHI) was greater than 5. The subjects' mean age was 49, AHI was 22, oxygen saturation was 93.6% and body mass index was 38. All subjects snored. Many subjects complained of falling asleep while driving (38.9%), working (27.8%), watching TV (61.1%), reading (66.7%), and riding in vehicle (61%). Other complaints included difficulty falling back to sleep (33.3%) and choking (38.9%) and gasping (44.4%) during sleep. Polysomnography showed decreased REM time (M=45.1, SD=33.4) and slow wave time (M=23, SD=40.7). Stage 1 (M=38.9, SD=31.1) and stage 2 (M=206.8, SD=68.7) sleep time were prolonged. Subjects who complained of difficulty falling back to sleep had shorter sleep latency (t=2.28, p < .05) and longer stage 1 sleep times (t=-3.06, p < .01). Those who tended to fall asleep while riding in vehicle had shorter REM sleep times (t=-3.39, p < .05). Daytime sleepiness and other complications of OSA have serious consequences. It is important for health providers to identify patients and help them treat the problem.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSleep Architecture and Sleep Complaints of Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apneaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158588-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Sleep Architecture and Sleep Complaints of Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Suen, Lee-Jen</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Akron</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 209 Carroll Street, MGH 101, Akron, OH, 44325-3701, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">330.972.5931</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lsuen@uakron.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep-related breathing disorder that can result in physical, psychological, and social disturbances. Patients' complaints typically arise from the chronic sleep disruption associated with OSA. However, without witnessed apnea, patients may not be aware of their problem. This study explores the relationship between the subjective sleep complaints and sleep architecture of patients with OSA. After reviewing sleep records originally collected for clinical purposes, 9 men and 9 women diagnosed with OSA were included in this study. Diagnosis and sleep architecture data were based on full-night polysomnographic study; sleep complaints were taken from a questionnaire. Patients were diagnosed with OSA if the number of apneas/hypopneas per hour of sleep (AHI) was greater than 5. The subjects' mean age was 49, AHI was 22, oxygen saturation was 93.6% and body mass index was 38. All subjects snored. Many subjects complained of falling asleep while driving (38.9%), working (27.8%), watching TV (61.1%), reading (66.7%), and riding in vehicle (61%). Other complaints included difficulty falling back to sleep (33.3%) and choking (38.9%) and gasping (44.4%) during sleep. Polysomnography showed decreased REM time (M=45.1, SD=33.4) and slow wave time (M=23, SD=40.7). Stage 1 (M=38.9, SD=31.1) and stage 2 (M=206.8, SD=68.7) sleep time were prolonged. Subjects who complained of difficulty falling back to sleep had shorter sleep latency (t=2.28, p &lt; .05) and longer stage 1 sleep times (t=-3.06, p &lt; .01). Those who tended to fall asleep while riding in vehicle had shorter REM sleep times (t=-3.39, p &lt; .05). Daytime sleepiness and other complications of OSA have serious consequences. It is important for health providers to identify patients and help them treat the problem.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:12:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:12:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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