Factors Related to Depression in Patients after Treatment for Localized Prostate Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158589
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors Related to Depression in Patients after Treatment for Localized Prostate Cancer
Abstract:
Factors Related to Depression in Patients after Treatment for Localized Prostate Cancer
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Rawl, Susan, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 1111 Middle Drive, NU 340C, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA
Contact Telephone:317.278.2217
Over 198,000 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer this year and most will elect to receive treatment with either surgery, radiation, or brachiatherapy. Current treatment options for prostate cancer result in significant side effects, chief most of which are urinary, bowel, and sexual dysfunction. These treatment side-effects negatively affect a man's sense of self worth and masculinity, feelings of isolation, fear, uncertainty and depression can result. The purpose of this descriptive, correlational study was to examine relationships between depression scores at baseline and other quality of life indicators at baseline and 4 months later. Depression was measured using the Center for Epidemiological Studies (CES-D) scale and global quality of life was measured using the MOS SF-36. Disease-specific quality of life outcomes of urinary, bowel and sexual function were measured using the Prostate Cancer Quality of Life Scale (Pc-QoL). Baseline and wave 2 (4 month) data were used from an ongoing prostate intervention trial. Eighty-seven patients provided data for this study. Depression scores were dichotomized as low (less than 12) or high (12 or higher) in order to examine differences between groups. No differences were found on treatment type or demographics. Results indicated that men with high depression scores at baseline had significantly greater urinary limitations (t=3.79,p=.00), greater sexual limitations (t=3.53, p=.001), sexual bother (t=3.08, p=.005), worse bowel function (t=4.04, p=00), more cancer worry (t=2.59, p=.01), and poorer dyadic satisfaction (t=3.20, p=.002). Men in the high depression group had lower scores on 7 of 8 subscales of the MOS SF-36: physical functioning (t=2.44,p=.02), social functioning (t=3.24, p=.002), role-physical (t=2.68, p=.009), role-emotional (t=6.64,p=.00), bodily pain (t=2.76, p=.007), vitality (t=3.95, p=.00), and the mental health index (t=5.94, p=.000). These differences persisted over time with the higher depression group having significantly poorer quality of life 4 months later. Implications will be discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors Related to Depression in Patients after Treatment for Localized Prostate Canceren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158589-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Factors Related to Depression in Patients after Treatment for Localized Prostate Cancer</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rawl, Susan, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 1111 Middle Drive, NU 340C, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">317.278.2217</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">srawl@iupui.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Over 198,000 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer this year and most will elect to receive treatment with either surgery, radiation, or brachiatherapy. Current treatment options for prostate cancer result in significant side effects, chief most of which are urinary, bowel, and sexual dysfunction. These treatment side-effects negatively affect a man's sense of self worth and masculinity, feelings of isolation, fear, uncertainty and depression can result. The purpose of this descriptive, correlational study was to examine relationships between depression scores at baseline and other quality of life indicators at baseline and 4 months later. Depression was measured using the Center for Epidemiological Studies (CES-D) scale and global quality of life was measured using the MOS SF-36. Disease-specific quality of life outcomes of urinary, bowel and sexual function were measured using the Prostate Cancer Quality of Life Scale (Pc-QoL). Baseline and wave 2 (4 month) data were used from an ongoing prostate intervention trial. Eighty-seven patients provided data for this study. Depression scores were dichotomized as low (less than 12) or high (12 or higher) in order to examine differences between groups. No differences were found on treatment type or demographics. Results indicated that men with high depression scores at baseline had significantly greater urinary limitations (t=3.79,p=.00), greater sexual limitations (t=3.53, p=.001), sexual bother (t=3.08, p=.005), worse bowel function (t=4.04, p=00), more cancer worry (t=2.59, p=.01), and poorer dyadic satisfaction (t=3.20, p=.002). Men in the high depression group had lower scores on 7 of 8 subscales of the MOS SF-36: physical functioning (t=2.44,p=.02), social functioning (t=3.24, p=.002), role-physical (t=2.68, p=.009), role-emotional (t=6.64,p=.00), bodily pain (t=2.76, p=.007), vitality (t=3.95, p=.00), and the mental health index (t=5.94, p=.000). These differences persisted over time with the higher depression group having significantly poorer quality of life 4 months later. Implications will be discussed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:12:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:12:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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