2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158591
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Developing a Measure of Interpersonal Reciprocity
Abstract:
Developing a Measure of Interpersonal Reciprocity
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Patusky, Kathleen
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 250 Cohn, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
Contact Telephone:313.577.8583
The Theory of Human Relatedness has identified four elements or competencies that determine an individual's degree of relatedness with others: sense of belonging, reciprocity, mutuality, and synchrony. The purpose of the current series of studies was to develop and test psychometrically a self-report instrument designed to measure the relatedness element of reciprocity, or equitable exchange, in adults. Congruent with the previously developed Sense of Belonging Instrument (SOBI), the Interpersonal Reciprocity Scales (IRS) consists of two separately scored scales, IRS-P (psychological state) and IRS-A (antecedents). Four stages of instrument development are described. First, content validity of items generated through literature review, clinical experience and focus group reports of relatedness experiences was assessed by a panel of experts, resulting in an initial item pool for each subscale. Second, items were piloted with a sample of over 90 adults, resulting in a 78-item measure with very good internal consistency. Third, construct validity and reliability were examined with a longitudinal sample of older adults, resulting in a valid and reliable 50-item measure for that subject group. Finally, construct validity, internal consistency, and retest reliability of the 78-item IRS were tested with two subject groups: over 300 college students and 75 domestic violence survivors. This last study compared performance of the IRS with the SOBI to assess shared variance of the two instruments as a step in evaluating their joint use in future studies. This study also examined a previous finding for verification: the presence of a change in the strength and direction of association between reciprocity and dependence relative to declining health status. The current version of the IRS demonstrates validity and reliability, and is presented for use, along with recommendations for joint use of the SOBI and the IRS. Future studies addressing instrument performance with different ethnic groups are discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDeveloping a Measure of Interpersonal Reciprocityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158591-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Developing a Measure of Interpersonal Reciprocity</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Patusky, Kathleen</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 250 Cohn, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">313.577.8583</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">k.patusky@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The Theory of Human Relatedness has identified four elements or competencies that determine an individual's degree of relatedness with others: sense of belonging, reciprocity, mutuality, and synchrony. The purpose of the current series of studies was to develop and test psychometrically a self-report instrument designed to measure the relatedness element of reciprocity, or equitable exchange, in adults. Congruent with the previously developed Sense of Belonging Instrument (SOBI), the Interpersonal Reciprocity Scales (IRS) consists of two separately scored scales, IRS-P (psychological state) and IRS-A (antecedents). Four stages of instrument development are described. First, content validity of items generated through literature review, clinical experience and focus group reports of relatedness experiences was assessed by a panel of experts, resulting in an initial item pool for each subscale. Second, items were piloted with a sample of over 90 adults, resulting in a 78-item measure with very good internal consistency. Third, construct validity and reliability were examined with a longitudinal sample of older adults, resulting in a valid and reliable 50-item measure for that subject group. Finally, construct validity, internal consistency, and retest reliability of the 78-item IRS were tested with two subject groups: over 300 college students and 75 domestic violence survivors. This last study compared performance of the IRS with the SOBI to assess shared variance of the two instruments as a step in evaluating their joint use in future studies. This study also examined a previous finding for verification: the presence of a change in the strength and direction of association between reciprocity and dependence relative to declining health status. The current version of the IRS demonstrates validity and reliability, and is presented for use, along with recommendations for joint use of the SOBI and the IRS. Future studies addressing instrument performance with different ethnic groups are discussed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:12:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:12:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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