Use of Environmental Stimulation to Promote Neurogenesis after Cerebral Ischemic Insult

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158599
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Use of Environmental Stimulation to Promote Neurogenesis after Cerebral Ischemic Insult
Abstract:
Use of Environmental Stimulation to Promote Neurogenesis after Cerebral Ischemic Insult
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Briones, Tess, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Research Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue, M/C 802, 750 NURS, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:312.355.3142
There is now compelling evidence that the normal adult brain is capable of neurogenesis (forming new neurons). However, the effects of injury on neurogenesis is still not fully understood. In the present study, we examined if sensory stimulation or physical activity was able to facilitate neurogenesis following cerebral ischemia, a brain injury model. Adult male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to either the ischemia or sham group. Animals in each group were further randomized to either complex environment exposure for sensory stimulation (EC), exercise for physical activity (EX), or paired housing (control). Within 24 hours following cerebral ischemia, rats were housed in their assigned environment for 14 days. To detect the presence of neurogenesis, rats were injected daily with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU [50 g/Kg, i.p.]) from 7-13 days following ischemia to capture the peak of cell proliferation. Quantitative analyses using immunohistochemical technique and relative optical density measures were then performed. Results showed a significant increased in the number of BrdU-positive cells exhibiting neuronal phenotype in the hippocampal formation (brain area involved in memory processing) of ischemic rats housed in EC and EX. These results suggests that environmental stimulation may be able to promote neurogenesis following injury to the adult brain.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUse of Environmental Stimulation to Promote Neurogenesis after Cerebral Ischemic Insulten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158599-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Use of Environmental Stimulation to Promote Neurogenesis after Cerebral Ischemic Insult</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Briones, Tess, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue, M/C 802, 750 NURS, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312.355.3142</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tbriones@uic.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">There is now compelling evidence that the normal adult brain is capable of neurogenesis (forming new neurons). However, the effects of injury on neurogenesis is still not fully understood. In the present study, we examined if sensory stimulation or physical activity was able to facilitate neurogenesis following cerebral ischemia, a brain injury model. Adult male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to either the ischemia or sham group. Animals in each group were further randomized to either complex environment exposure for sensory stimulation (EC), exercise for physical activity (EX), or paired housing (control). Within 24 hours following cerebral ischemia, rats were housed in their assigned environment for 14 days. To detect the presence of neurogenesis, rats were injected daily with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU [50 g/Kg, i.p.]) from 7-13 days following ischemia to capture the peak of cell proliferation. Quantitative analyses using immunohistochemical technique and relative optical density measures were then performed. Results showed a significant increased in the number of BrdU-positive cells exhibiting neuronal phenotype in the hippocampal formation (brain area involved in memory processing) of ischemic rats housed in EC and EX. These results suggests that environmental stimulation may be able to promote neurogenesis following injury to the adult brain.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:12:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:12:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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