2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158602
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Gaining Insight into the Meaning of a Diabetes Care Coordination Intervention
Abstract:
Gaining Insight into the Meaning of a Diabetes Care Coordination Intervention
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Lee, Jan, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls Building, 1154 SNB, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA
Contact Telephone:734.764.2385
To increase understanding of veterans' responses to a diabetes care coordination intervention, structured interviews via phone were completed with veterans who had participated in the intervention arm of a larger randomized control trial. Ecological theory and Donabedian's quality framework of structure-process-outcome guided this investigation. Veterans were recruited, and informed consent obtained for participation in the audio taped phone interview, during the exit interview for the randomized control trial. A structured interview guide, including both closed- and open-ended questions, was developed. The interview guide focused on satisfaction with care, expectations for care, and barriers and facilitators to care. Probes were used as needed to elicit and clarify responses. One graduate nursing student, trained in qualitative interviewing techniques, completed all phone interviews and transcribed the audiotapes verbatim. Forty-one veterans were interviewed; forty interviews were usable. Sample size was predicated on theoretical saturation and pragmatic concerns of funds budgeted for veteran compensation. Data were analyzed using frequency counts, content analysis, case analysis, and comparison of cases. A data matrix was constructed to assist in data analysis. Overall, veterans were very satisfied with the diabetes care coordination and their expectations for care were met. Time and money were frequently mentioned as barriers to care, while many veterans cited the knowledgeable care and concern of the diabetes care coordinator as a facilitator. No visible shared pattern of responses was identified for the negative cases. Veterans with negative responses eloquently described specific life situations that complicated their care situation. This finding reveals the importance of the person-intervention-system interaction.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGaining Insight into the Meaning of a Diabetes Care Coordination Interventionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158602-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Gaining Insight into the Meaning of a Diabetes Care Coordination Intervention</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lee, Jan, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls Building, 1154 SNB, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734.764.2385</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">janlee@umich.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">To increase understanding of veterans' responses to a diabetes care coordination intervention, structured interviews via phone were completed with veterans who had participated in the intervention arm of a larger randomized control trial. Ecological theory and Donabedian's quality framework of structure-process-outcome guided this investigation. Veterans were recruited, and informed consent obtained for participation in the audio taped phone interview, during the exit interview for the randomized control trial. A structured interview guide, including both closed- and open-ended questions, was developed. The interview guide focused on satisfaction with care, expectations for care, and barriers and facilitators to care. Probes were used as needed to elicit and clarify responses. One graduate nursing student, trained in qualitative interviewing techniques, completed all phone interviews and transcribed the audiotapes verbatim. Forty-one veterans were interviewed; forty interviews were usable. Sample size was predicated on theoretical saturation and pragmatic concerns of funds budgeted for veteran compensation. Data were analyzed using frequency counts, content analysis, case analysis, and comparison of cases. A data matrix was constructed to assist in data analysis. Overall, veterans were very satisfied with the diabetes care coordination and their expectations for care were met. Time and money were frequently mentioned as barriers to care, while many veterans cited the knowledgeable care and concern of the diabetes care coordinator as a facilitator. No visible shared pattern of responses was identified for the negative cases. Veterans with negative responses eloquently described specific life situations that complicated their care situation. This finding reveals the importance of the person-intervention-system interaction.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:13:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:13:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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