Patient-Perception of Nursing Care Quality in the Hospital Setting: Instrument Development

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158604
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patient-Perception of Nursing Care Quality in the Hospital Setting: Instrument Development
Abstract:
Patient-Perception of Nursing Care Quality in the Hospital Setting: Instrument Development
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Chang, Karen
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 1111 Middle Drive, NU 132, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA
The purpose of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the patient-perceived nursing care quality (PNCQ) instrument. The PNCQ was developed through extensive literature review, content analysis of published instruments, patient interviews, and content validation from patients and health care professionals. The PNCQ was a 21-item telephone interview questionnaire with two response scales (the quality scale and the frequency scale). A cross-sectional design was used. The sample consisted of adult patients who were discharged from eight medical-surgical units of two acute care hospitals in the Midwest. Patients were selected based on inclusion criteria. The final sample size for the analysis was 312. Statistical analyses used were: exploratory factor analysis (EFA), confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), Cronbach's alpha coefficients, multivariate linear regression, one-way analysis of variance, generalized chi-square for categorical data, and canonical and Pearson correlation. Two independent subsamples were used to perform EFA and CFA. EFA extracted three factors that explained 59.97% of the total variances. The factors were named: Professional Competency, Informational Needs, and Physical Environment. CFA supported a modified 3-factor model. Cronbach's alpha coefficients of the total scale and the subscales were .94, .92, .84, and .76 respectively. Three factors explained 69% of the total variance of overall nursing care quality. Professional Competency explained 22% of the total variance of intention to return. Professional Competency and Physical Environment explained 31% of the total variance of intention to refer. The PNCQ detected significant differences of mean PNCQ scores among four units in hospital 1, but not in hospital 2. The findings of patient comments converged with the findings of PNCQ scores. Three factors had high correlation with the Patient Judgment System (PJS) nurses' care and low correlation with the PJS doctors' care. Overall, the PNCQ demonstrated construct validity and internal consistency in this study.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatient-Perception of Nursing Care Quality in the Hospital Setting: Instrument Developmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158604-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Patient-Perception of Nursing Care Quality in the Hospital Setting: Instrument Development</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Chang, Karen</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 1111 Middle Drive, NU 132, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the patient-perceived nursing care quality (PNCQ) instrument. The PNCQ was developed through extensive literature review, content analysis of published instruments, patient interviews, and content validation from patients and health care professionals. The PNCQ was a 21-item telephone interview questionnaire with two response scales (the quality scale and the frequency scale). A cross-sectional design was used. The sample consisted of adult patients who were discharged from eight medical-surgical units of two acute care hospitals in the Midwest. Patients were selected based on inclusion criteria. The final sample size for the analysis was 312. Statistical analyses used were: exploratory factor analysis (EFA), confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), Cronbach's alpha coefficients, multivariate linear regression, one-way analysis of variance, generalized chi-square for categorical data, and canonical and Pearson correlation. Two independent subsamples were used to perform EFA and CFA. EFA extracted three factors that explained 59.97% of the total variances. The factors were named: Professional Competency, Informational Needs, and Physical Environment. CFA supported a modified 3-factor model. Cronbach's alpha coefficients of the total scale and the subscales were .94, .92, .84, and .76 respectively. Three factors explained 69% of the total variance of overall nursing care quality. Professional Competency explained 22% of the total variance of intention to return. Professional Competency and Physical Environment explained 31% of the total variance of intention to refer. The PNCQ detected significant differences of mean PNCQ scores among four units in hospital 1, but not in hospital 2. The findings of patient comments converged with the findings of PNCQ scores. Three factors had high correlation with the Patient Judgment System (PJS) nurses' care and low correlation with the PJS doctors' care. Overall, the PNCQ demonstrated construct validity and internal consistency in this study.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:13:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:13:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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