2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158605
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Quality of Care in U.S. Emergency Departments
Abstract:
Quality of Care in U.S. Emergency Departments
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:MacLean, Susan
P.I. Institution Name:Emergency Nurses Association
Title:Group Director
Contact Address:915 Lee Street, Des Plaines, IL, 60016-6569, USA
Contact Telephone:800.900.9659
Purpose: Concerns about the quality of emergency health care require health professionals to examine their clinical and management decisions from a quality of care perspective by examining ED structures, processes, and outcomes. The purpose of the 2001 ENA National Emergency Department Database Survey was to provide comprehensive data on the delivery of care in emergency departments. Data were collected on acuity, length of stay, waiting time, diversion, overcrowding, quality of care, and ED demographics. Sample: The 2001 survey was completed by 1,412 U.S. emergency departments. Instrument: The 52-question mailed survey was based on four previous surveys and a content review by experts. Data were analyzed using descriptive, univariate, and multivariate statistics. Results: The EDs were trauma centers (42%), urban (71%), and not-for profit (70%). In most EDs, emergent patients were evaluated in 15 minutes or less, urgent patients within 30 minutes, and nonurgent patients within 1 hour. Most patients were discharged within 3 hours. Delays in discharge were attributed most often to waiting for inpatient beds (48%) and waiting for consultations (25%). Overcrowding occurred several times a week in 50% of the EDs. About one-third of the EDs experienced an average of 72 hours of diversion over a 6-month period due to limited critical care (31%), acute care (23%), and ED beds (22%). EDs avoided diversion by staff overtime (31%), using holding areas (24%), and implementing on-call systems (20%). The EDs rated the overall quality of care as good (53%) or excellent (45%), and patient satisfaction as good (64%) or excellent (27%). Conclusions: Emergency departments provided timely care even under difficult situations such as overcrowding and limited bed availability. The quality and satisfaction with care was rated as good to excellent. The results identified target areas for enhancing the delivery of emergency care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleQuality of Care in U.S. Emergency Departmentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158605-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Quality of Care in U.S. Emergency Departments</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">MacLean, Susan</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Group Director</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">915 Lee Street, Des Plaines, IL, 60016-6569, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">800.900.9659</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">smaclean@ena.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Concerns about the quality of emergency health care require health professionals to examine their clinical and management decisions from a quality of care perspective by examining ED structures, processes, and outcomes. The purpose of the 2001 ENA National Emergency Department Database Survey was to provide comprehensive data on the delivery of care in emergency departments. Data were collected on acuity, length of stay, waiting time, diversion, overcrowding, quality of care, and ED demographics. Sample: The 2001 survey was completed by 1,412 U.S. emergency departments. Instrument: The 52-question mailed survey was based on four previous surveys and a content review by experts. Data were analyzed using descriptive, univariate, and multivariate statistics. Results: The EDs were trauma centers (42%), urban (71%), and not-for profit (70%). In most EDs, emergent patients were evaluated in 15 minutes or less, urgent patients within 30 minutes, and nonurgent patients within 1 hour. Most patients were discharged within 3 hours. Delays in discharge were attributed most often to waiting for inpatient beds (48%) and waiting for consultations (25%). Overcrowding occurred several times a week in 50% of the EDs. About one-third of the EDs experienced an average of 72 hours of diversion over a 6-month period due to limited critical care (31%), acute care (23%), and ED beds (22%). EDs avoided diversion by staff overtime (31%), using holding areas (24%), and implementing on-call systems (20%). The EDs rated the overall quality of care as good (53%) or excellent (45%), and patient satisfaction as good (64%) or excellent (27%). Conclusions: Emergency departments provided timely care even under difficult situations such as overcrowding and limited bed availability. The quality and satisfaction with care was rated as good to excellent. The results identified target areas for enhancing the delivery of emergency care.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:13:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:13:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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