Relationship between Serum Leptin and Indices of Sleeping Energy Expenditure in Sedentary Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158606
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relationship between Serum Leptin and Indices of Sleeping Energy Expenditure in Sedentary Women
Abstract:
Relationship between Serum Leptin and Indices of Sleeping Energy Expenditure in Sedentary Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Nies, Mary, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Title:Associate Dean for Research
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 319 Cohn, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
Contact Telephone:313.577.4135
Currently, more than 50% of adults in the United States are overweight and nearly 20% are obese. Leptin is one hormone thought to influence bodyweight regulation by decreasing food intake and increasing energy expenditure. Interestingly, studies of humans have been limited to waking states. As waking states are potentially more prone to external influence, the purpose of this study is to investigate whether serum leptin levels are associated with sleeping energy expenditure. Basal serum leptin levels, sleeping energy expenditure, and percentage body fat were obtained from 17 sedentary women. Results of heirarchical regression analysis controlling for percentage body fat revealed that serum leptin levels predicted sleep in genergy expenditure t(1, 16)=2.23, p=.045. Results suggest that serum leptin levels maybe associated with sleep or basal energy expenditure. An improved understanding of the biological mechanisms that regulate body weight may lead to more effective interventions for obesity.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelationship between Serum Leptin and Indices of Sleeping Energy Expenditure in Sedentary Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158606-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Relationship between Serum Leptin and Indices of Sleeping Energy Expenditure in Sedentary Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Nies, Mary, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Dean for Research</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 319 Cohn, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">313.577.4135</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">m.nies@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Currently, more than 50% of adults in the United States are overweight and nearly 20% are obese. Leptin is one hormone thought to influence bodyweight regulation by decreasing food intake and increasing energy expenditure. Interestingly, studies of humans have been limited to waking states. As waking states are potentially more prone to external influence, the purpose of this study is to investigate whether serum leptin levels are associated with sleeping energy expenditure. Basal serum leptin levels, sleeping energy expenditure, and percentage body fat were obtained from 17 sedentary women. Results of heirarchical regression analysis controlling for percentage body fat revealed that serum leptin levels predicted sleep in genergy expenditure t(1, 16)=2.23, p=.045. Results suggest that serum leptin levels maybe associated with sleep or basal energy expenditure. An improved understanding of the biological mechanisms that regulate body weight may lead to more effective interventions for obesity.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:13:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:13:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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