2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158607
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Self-Treatment of Pain in a Rural Community: a Canadian Comparison
Abstract:
Self-Treatment of Pain in a Rural Community: a Canadian Comparison
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Riley-Doucet, Cheryl
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Title:Doctoral Student
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 364 Cohn, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
Contact Telephone:313.577.0359
Pain of all types is an international concern. National and international health surveys indicate that the majority of our society experience pain regularly, and frequently rely on self-treatment and/or self-medication of their pain. As the number of medications a patient takes increases, so does the likelihood of experiencing drug interactions that pose a potentially serious health threat to the patient. In addition, an increasing number of patients are seeking alternative therapies, often without informing their traditional health care practitioners. This exploratory/descriptive study is designed to identify the occurrence of pain and the modalities of self-treatment of pain used by members of a rural Canadian community. Potential interactions between pain self-treatment modalities and other medications being taken are also explored. Factors that may affect self-treatment choices include income, ethnicity, educational level, and age. This information will contribute to knowledge of current treatment choices regarding pain management and potentially harmful interactions. Self-report questionnaires will be administered to 100 adults 18 years and older. Participants are English and French speaking Canadians living within a rural Eastern Canadian community. Data from this study will be compared with data from a previous study of the self-treatment modalities of people in an American rural community. The comparison of data from different North American studies will enhance our knowledge about the influence of international health care systems and medication availability in relation to different self-treatment practices for relief of pain. Combined data will be used to develop intervention strategies to minimize the effects of interactions resulting from the self-treatment of pain.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSelf-Treatment of Pain in a Rural Community: a Canadian Comparisonen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158607-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Self-Treatment of Pain in a Rural Community: a Canadian Comparison</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Riley-Doucet, Cheryl</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 364 Cohn, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">313.577.0359</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ag2706@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Pain of all types is an international concern. National and international health surveys indicate that the majority of our society experience pain regularly, and frequently rely on self-treatment and/or self-medication of their pain. As the number of medications a patient takes increases, so does the likelihood of experiencing drug interactions that pose a potentially serious health threat to the patient. In addition, an increasing number of patients are seeking alternative therapies, often without informing their traditional health care practitioners. This exploratory/descriptive study is designed to identify the occurrence of pain and the modalities of self-treatment of pain used by members of a rural Canadian community. Potential interactions between pain self-treatment modalities and other medications being taken are also explored. Factors that may affect self-treatment choices include income, ethnicity, educational level, and age. This information will contribute to knowledge of current treatment choices regarding pain management and potentially harmful interactions. Self-report questionnaires will be administered to 100 adults 18 years and older. Participants are English and French speaking Canadians living within a rural Eastern Canadian community. Data from this study will be compared with data from a previous study of the self-treatment modalities of people in an American rural community. The comparison of data from different North American studies will enhance our knowledge about the influence of international health care systems and medication availability in relation to different self-treatment practices for relief of pain. Combined data will be used to develop intervention strategies to minimize the effects of interactions resulting from the self-treatment of pain.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:13:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:13:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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