2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158608
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Teaching Acceptance to Chronically Ill Older Adults
Abstract:
Teaching Acceptance to Chronically Ill Older Adults
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:McDonald, Patricia
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA
Contact Telephone:216.368.3345
Approximately 80% of older adults have at least one chronic condition; yet, acceptance of their chronic illnesses leading to better health outcomes has not been studied. Because of their value orientation, two nursing strategies were conceptually linked to design and test a group intervention (1) group counseling to foster acceptance of chronic conditions in elders based on Ellis' (1965) rational-emotive behavior therapy, and (2) relaxation with guided imagery adapted from Wright's (1960) work that focuses on the process of acceptance as a series of value changes. Elders are encouraged to give up their "disapproval" of chronic illness symptoms and are helped to accept "good" and "bad" days as general life conditions. During guided imagery, elders use their senses and memory to engage the imagination in visualizing health problems in a way that challenges old values while encouraging new ones. Forty-eight elders with 12 from each of four randomly selected northeast Ohio retirement communities will be interviewed four times (1 pre- and 3 post-intervention intervals) over a six-month period. These elders will receive the two-hour weekly Acceptance Training intervention provided by a trained nurse clinician for six weeks between the first two interviews. They will be compared to groups of elders from other retirement communities who participate in either Resourcefulness Training or diversional activities on measures of acceptance of chronic conditions, self-assessed health, functional status, anxiety, and depression across the four data points. A priori planned comparisons will be used to differentiate the effects of the three interventions and to partial out potential effects due to demographics (age, gender, race / ethnicity) and chronic conditions. Treatment effects will be examined for immediate, 6-week lagged, and 3-month extended effects. This study is unique in determining the effects of acceptance training on indicators of physical and psychological health in elders with chronic conditions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTeaching Acceptance to Chronically Ill Older Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158608-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Teaching Acceptance to Chronically Ill Older Adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McDonald, Patricia</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216.368.3345</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pxm9@po.cwru.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Approximately 80% of older adults have at least one chronic condition; yet, acceptance of their chronic illnesses leading to better health outcomes has not been studied. Because of their value orientation, two nursing strategies were conceptually linked to design and test a group intervention (1) group counseling to foster acceptance of chronic conditions in elders based on Ellis' (1965) rational-emotive behavior therapy, and (2) relaxation with guided imagery adapted from Wright's (1960) work that focuses on the process of acceptance as a series of value changes. Elders are encouraged to give up their &quot;disapproval&quot; of chronic illness symptoms and are helped to accept &quot;good&quot; and &quot;bad&quot; days as general life conditions. During guided imagery, elders use their senses and memory to engage the imagination in visualizing health problems in a way that challenges old values while encouraging new ones. Forty-eight elders with 12 from each of four randomly selected northeast Ohio retirement communities will be interviewed four times (1 pre- and 3 post-intervention intervals) over a six-month period. These elders will receive the two-hour weekly Acceptance Training intervention provided by a trained nurse clinician for six weeks between the first two interviews. They will be compared to groups of elders from other retirement communities who participate in either Resourcefulness Training or diversional activities on measures of acceptance of chronic conditions, self-assessed health, functional status, anxiety, and depression across the four data points. A priori planned comparisons will be used to differentiate the effects of the three interventions and to partial out potential effects due to demographics (age, gender, race / ethnicity) and chronic conditions. Treatment effects will be examined for immediate, 6-week lagged, and 3-month extended effects. This study is unique in determining the effects of acceptance training on indicators of physical and psychological health in elders with chronic conditions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:13:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:13:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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