2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158609
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Types of Knowledge Used to Formulate Experimental Nursing Practice Interventions
Abstract:
Types of Knowledge Used to Formulate Experimental Nursing Practice Interventions
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Floyd, Judith, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 300 Cohn, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
Contact Telephone:313.577.4383
The purpose of this systematic review of research that evaluates nursing interventions is twofold: (a) to classify the evidence base that underpins experimental interventions in nursing research, and (b) to compare the effectiveness of interventions derived from empirics with other patterns of knowing in nursing. Electronic searches of CINAHL supplemented by reviews of titles and abstracts have been used to locate nursing intervention studies with experimental or quasi-experimental designs. Research reports that evaluate nursing interventions experimentally are being retrieved and coded by two reviewers to classify the knowledge base used to develop the intervention. The knowledge base for each intervention is coded using a schema anchored by Carper's (1978) four ways of knowing and expanded to incorporate types of evidence discussed in current nursing literature including Closs & Cheeter (1999); Goode & Piedalue (1999); Fawcett, Watson, Neuman, Walker, & Fitzpatrick (2001); Ingersoll (2000); Jennings & Loan (2001); Mitchell (1999); and Stetler, Brunell, Giuliano, Morsi, Prince, & Newell-Stokes (1998). Thus far, the review has identified the following types of knowledge as underpinning interventions evaluated in nursing research: Untested theories, theories with empirical support, standards of practice, codes of ethics, legislated mandates, philosophies of nursing, quality improvement data, evaluation data, the consensus of recognized experts, and affirmed personal experience. Rarely has an experimental intervention been based on a single source of knowledge. In addition to coding specific sources of knowledge used to formulate the intervention, additional information is recorded for each study including: (a) bibliographic and publication features, (b) design, sampling, data collection, and analysis methods, (c) characteristics of the intervention including purpose and mode of delivery, (d) specific patient outcomes, and (e) results including effect sizes when possible or data that can be used to generate effect sizes (e.g., direction of finding, p-values, magnitude of statistics, and sample size).
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTypes of Knowledge Used to Formulate Experimental Nursing Practice Interventionsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158609-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Types of Knowledge Used to Formulate Experimental Nursing Practice Interventions</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Floyd, Judith, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 300 Cohn, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">313.577.4383</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">judith.floyd@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this systematic review of research that evaluates nursing interventions is twofold: (a) to classify the evidence base that underpins experimental interventions in nursing research, and (b) to compare the effectiveness of interventions derived from empirics with other patterns of knowing in nursing. Electronic searches of CINAHL supplemented by reviews of titles and abstracts have been used to locate nursing intervention studies with experimental or quasi-experimental designs. Research reports that evaluate nursing interventions experimentally are being retrieved and coded by two reviewers to classify the knowledge base used to develop the intervention. The knowledge base for each intervention is coded using a schema anchored by Carper's (1978) four ways of knowing and expanded to incorporate types of evidence discussed in current nursing literature including Closs &amp; Cheeter (1999); Goode &amp; Piedalue (1999); Fawcett, Watson, Neuman, Walker, &amp; Fitzpatrick (2001); Ingersoll (2000); Jennings &amp; Loan (2001); Mitchell (1999); and Stetler, Brunell, Giuliano, Morsi, Prince, &amp; Newell-Stokes (1998). Thus far, the review has identified the following types of knowledge as underpinning interventions evaluated in nursing research: Untested theories, theories with empirical support, standards of practice, codes of ethics, legislated mandates, philosophies of nursing, quality improvement data, evaluation data, the consensus of recognized experts, and affirmed personal experience. Rarely has an experimental intervention been based on a single source of knowledge. In addition to coding specific sources of knowledge used to formulate the intervention, additional information is recorded for each study including: (a) bibliographic and publication features, (b) design, sampling, data collection, and analysis methods, (c) characteristics of the intervention including purpose and mode of delivery, (d) specific patient outcomes, and (e) results including effect sizes when possible or data that can be used to generate effect sizes (e.g., direction of finding, p-values, magnitude of statistics, and sample size).</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:13:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:13:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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