Effect of a School-Based Program on the Cardiovascular Fitness of School-Aged Children: a Pilot Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158611
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effect of a School-Based Program on the Cardiovascular Fitness of School-Aged Children: a Pilot Study
Abstract:
Effect of a School-Based Program on the Cardiovascular Fitness of School-Aged Children: a Pilot Study
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Sweat, Mary
P.I. Institution Name:Research College
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 2316 East Meyer Boulevard, Kansas City, MO, 64132, USA
Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death of adults in the United States. Many of the modifiable risk factors involve lifestyle habits that are formed in childhood. Purpose: To determine the effect of a school-based program on the cardiovascular fitness of school-aged children. Conceptual Framework: Becker's Health Belief Model and Pender's Health Promotion Model were used. The child growth and development standards were based on CDC growth charts, Piaget's theory, and Erickson's theory. Sample: A convenience sample of 3rd and 4th graders in an elementary school with a predominantly African-American population was the subject of the study for a total of 101. Method: The third and forth grade teachers were oriented to the American Heart Association's Heart Power! Program. They incorporated lessons on healthy heart, physical activity, nutrition, and tobacco use into their class curriculum for 8 weeks. A knowledge pretest and posttest was administered. BP, P, Wt, and Ht were taken before and after the program. It was hypothesized that the post-intervention results would show improvement in knowledge and physiologic measurers. There were 4 experimental and 3 control groups. Results: The knowledge test results showed a significant change pre- and post-intervention on the experimental 3rd grade group. No significant changes were found with vital signs, wt/ht, and BMI. Twenty-four (23%) of our study population had BMIs of 95th percentile and above. Six of the 24 obese children (25%) had systolic BPs of 95th percentile and above. Conclusion: A large percentage of children were found to be obese, 23% compared to 13.6% nationally. A more structured, and possibly longitudinal study is needed to fully evaluate the effectiveness of this program. Several implications also need further follow-up.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffect of a School-Based Program on the Cardiovascular Fitness of School-Aged Children: a Pilot Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158611-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effect of a School-Based Program on the Cardiovascular Fitness of School-Aged Children: a Pilot Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sweat, Mary</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Research College</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 2316 East Meyer Boulevard, Kansas City, MO, 64132, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death of adults in the United States. Many of the modifiable risk factors involve lifestyle habits that are formed in childhood. Purpose: To determine the effect of a school-based program on the cardiovascular fitness of school-aged children. Conceptual Framework: Becker's Health Belief Model and Pender's Health Promotion Model were used. The child growth and development standards were based on CDC growth charts, Piaget's theory, and Erickson's theory. Sample: A convenience sample of 3rd and 4th graders in an elementary school with a predominantly African-American population was the subject of the study for a total of 101. Method: The third and forth grade teachers were oriented to the American Heart Association's Heart Power! Program. They incorporated lessons on healthy heart, physical activity, nutrition, and tobacco use into their class curriculum for 8 weeks. A knowledge pretest and posttest was administered. BP, P, Wt, and Ht were taken before and after the program. It was hypothesized that the post-intervention results would show improvement in knowledge and physiologic measurers. There were 4 experimental and 3 control groups. Results: The knowledge test results showed a significant change pre- and post-intervention on the experimental 3rd grade group. No significant changes were found with vital signs, wt/ht, and BMI. Twenty-four (23%) of our study population had BMIs of 95th percentile and above. Six of the 24 obese children (25%) had systolic BPs of 95th percentile and above. Conclusion: A large percentage of children were found to be obese, 23% compared to 13.6% nationally. A more structured, and possibly longitudinal study is needed to fully evaluate the effectiveness of this program. Several implications also need further follow-up.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:13:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:13:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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