2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158614
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurses' Experiences of Working with Abused Children in Taiwan
Abstract:
Nurses' Experiences of Working with Abused Children in Taiwan
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Jezewski, Mary, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University at Buffalo at SUNY
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 1010 Kimball Tower, South Campus, Buffalo, NY, 14214-3079, USA
Contact Telephone:716.829.3276
The purpose of this exploratory qualitative study is to describe the experiences with, attitudes toward, and practice behaviors of nurses regarding child abuse in Taiwan. Child abuse has been recognized by the World Health Organization as a major health problem ruining the health and welfare of children. Nurses play important roles in helping abused children: recognition, reporting, treatment, and prevention. However, there is a dearth of literature on child abuse and nursing roles on child abuse in Taiwan. The grounded theory method was used to sample nurses in Taiwan, collect and analyze data in this study. The sample was composed of eighteen registered nurses who have experiences working with abused children and their families in Taiwan. Individual in-depth, semi-structured, formal interviews with nurses were conducted during the summer of 2000. All interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. The length of interviews was ranged from 20 minutes to one hour. The nurses' descriptions of their experiences with abused children were the events that were sampled and included interactions as well as the conditions that gave rise to the interaction, the range of variation, the dynamics of action and the strategies used by the nurses, children and families regarding child abuse. Data were analyzed using the constant comparative method. The nurses identified several categories of powerlessness, culture, and needed education. The results of the analysis will yield theoretical models that explain nurses' experiences with, attitude toward, educational needs, and barriers regarding child abuse in Taiwan. The results of this study will assist the investigator in developing an intervention designed to facilitate nurses taking care of abused children in Taiwan. Finding from this study can provide a substantive base for understanding the phenomenon and add to the scientific body of knowledge related to this universal health problem cross-culturally.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurses' Experiences of Working with Abused Children in Taiwanen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158614-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nurses' Experiences of Working with Abused Children in Taiwan</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jezewski, Mary, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University at Buffalo at SUNY</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 1010 Kimball Tower, South Campus, Buffalo, NY, 14214-3079, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">716.829.3276</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jezewski@buffalo.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this exploratory qualitative study is to describe the experiences with, attitudes toward, and practice behaviors of nurses regarding child abuse in Taiwan. Child abuse has been recognized by the World Health Organization as a major health problem ruining the health and welfare of children. Nurses play important roles in helping abused children: recognition, reporting, treatment, and prevention. However, there is a dearth of literature on child abuse and nursing roles on child abuse in Taiwan. The grounded theory method was used to sample nurses in Taiwan, collect and analyze data in this study. The sample was composed of eighteen registered nurses who have experiences working with abused children and their families in Taiwan. Individual in-depth, semi-structured, formal interviews with nurses were conducted during the summer of 2000. All interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. The length of interviews was ranged from 20 minutes to one hour. The nurses' descriptions of their experiences with abused children were the events that were sampled and included interactions as well as the conditions that gave rise to the interaction, the range of variation, the dynamics of action and the strategies used by the nurses, children and families regarding child abuse. Data were analyzed using the constant comparative method. The nurses identified several categories of powerlessness, culture, and needed education. The results of the analysis will yield theoretical models that explain nurses' experiences with, attitude toward, educational needs, and barriers regarding child abuse in Taiwan. The results of this study will assist the investigator in developing an intervention designed to facilitate nurses taking care of abused children in Taiwan. Finding from this study can provide a substantive base for understanding the phenomenon and add to the scientific body of knowledge related to this universal health problem cross-culturally.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:13:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:13:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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