The Impact of Curriculum on Attitudes of Nursing Students toward Individuals with Physical or Mental Disabilities

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158616
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Impact of Curriculum on Attitudes of Nursing Students toward Individuals with Physical or Mental Disabilities
Abstract:
The Impact of Curriculum on Attitudes of Nursing Students toward Individuals with Physical or Mental Disabilities
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Emrich, Kathleen
P.I. Institution Name:Oakland University
Title:Interim Dean
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 428 O, Rochester, MI, 48309-4401, USA
PURPOSE: To measure the impact of exposure to theoretical and experiential learning about the chronically ill on the attitudes of nursing students toward individuals with disabilities or mental illness. CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK: The attitudes of health professionals are key to their responses to individuals with disabilities or mental illness. Professionals' responses impact patients' self image and outcomes of nursing care. Societal attitudes toward vulnerable populations are often based on lack of understanding and on stereotypes learned from others. Nursing students reflect societal beliefs. Carefully structured education about these at risk populations and their needs can affect students' attitudes and beliefs. SAMPLE: A convenience sample of senior nursing students (n=64) at a Midwestern state university METHOD: A pre/post test design measuring attitudes toward the mentally ill and individuals with disabilities was administered at a nine-month interval at the beginning and the end of the curricular year focusing on care of chronically ill. Form B of the Attitude Toward Disabled Persons Scale (ATDP) (Yukor & Block, 1986) was used to measure attitudes toward those with physical disabilities. Murray & Chambers' (1991) adaptation of the ATDP was employed to measured attitudes toward the mentally ill. Demographic and experiential information was collected to identify student exposure to the target groups. RESULTS: Paired t-tests indicated a significant positive attitude change after exposure to a course on chronic health conditions that included theoretical and clinical components related to both individuals with disabilities (t=-1.988, p < .05) and those who are mentally ill (t=6.984, p < .001). The effect persisted for at least 16 weeks after course exposure. CONCLUSIONS: A structured experience related to persons with disabilities or mental illness resulted in a positive attitude change among nursing students. In the present study, carefully constructed curricular elements emphasizing chronic condition management and focusing on functional outcomes produced a significant and persistent positive attitude change among senior nursing students.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Impact of Curriculum on Attitudes of Nursing Students toward Individuals with Physical or Mental Disabilitiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158616-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Impact of Curriculum on Attitudes of Nursing Students toward Individuals with Physical or Mental Disabilities</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Emrich, Kathleen</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Oakland University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Interim Dean</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 428 O, Rochester, MI, 48309-4401, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE: To measure the impact of exposure to theoretical and experiential learning about the chronically ill on the attitudes of nursing students toward individuals with disabilities or mental illness. CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK: The attitudes of health professionals are key to their responses to individuals with disabilities or mental illness. Professionals' responses impact patients' self image and outcomes of nursing care. Societal attitudes toward vulnerable populations are often based on lack of understanding and on stereotypes learned from others. Nursing students reflect societal beliefs. Carefully structured education about these at risk populations and their needs can affect students' attitudes and beliefs. SAMPLE: A convenience sample of senior nursing students (n=64) at a Midwestern state university METHOD: A pre/post test design measuring attitudes toward the mentally ill and individuals with disabilities was administered at a nine-month interval at the beginning and the end of the curricular year focusing on care of chronically ill. Form B of the Attitude Toward Disabled Persons Scale (ATDP) (Yukor &amp; Block, 1986) was used to measure attitudes toward those with physical disabilities. Murray &amp; Chambers' (1991) adaptation of the ATDP was employed to measured attitudes toward the mentally ill. Demographic and experiential information was collected to identify student exposure to the target groups. RESULTS: Paired t-tests indicated a significant positive attitude change after exposure to a course on chronic health conditions that included theoretical and clinical components related to both individuals with disabilities (t=-1.988, p &lt; .05) and those who are mentally ill (t=6.984, p &lt; .001). The effect persisted for at least 16 weeks after course exposure. CONCLUSIONS: A structured experience related to persons with disabilities or mental illness resulted in a positive attitude change among nursing students. In the present study, carefully constructed curricular elements emphasizing chronic condition management and focusing on functional outcomes produced a significant and persistent positive attitude change among senior nursing students.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:13:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:13:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.