Everyday Life for Black American Adults: Stress, Emotional and Cardiovascular Responses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158624
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Everyday Life for Black American Adults: Stress, Emotional and Cardiovascular Responses
Abstract:
Everyday Life for Black American Adults: Stress, Emotional and Cardiovascular Responses
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Brown, Debra
Contact Address:SON, 226 Ridge Trail, Chapel Hill, NC, 27516, USA
The purpose of this study was to examine the stress process in Black American adults by exploring chronic stress, emotions, age, body mass index, and blood pressure within the context of gender and socioeconomic position (SEP). A sociopsychophysiological framework of Everyday Life for Black American Adults was tested using structural equation modeling. The convenience sample of Black American adults (N=211) ranged from 25 to 79 years of age (M=44.90). Participants were highly educated and almost half was married. Household sizes ranged from one to eight people (M=2.8) with family per capita incomes ranging from zero to $75,000 (M=$18,990). Although chi-square was significant (X2=18.05, df=10, p=.054), the GFI (.98), TLI (.93), and CFI (.98) indexes indicated acceptable fit of the model which explained 27% of the variance in systolic blood pressure and 17% of the variance in diastolic blood pressure. SEP had a significant effect on chronic stress (B=-0.376, p>.001) and chronic stress had a significant effect on negative affect (B=.489, b=1.809, p<.001). Neither SEP, chronic stress, nor emotions had significant effects on blood pressure. Although women had higher negative affect scores than men (B=-.155, b=2.771, p<.01), men’s diastolic blood pressures were on average 4 mm Hg higher than women’s (B=-.132, b=-3.584, p<.05). Findings indicated that gender, SEP, chronic stress, and emotional responses did not have the expected negative effects on blood pressure in this sample of highly educated, high income Black American adults. These findings are useful to nurses as they develop and implement interventions to eliminate disparities in health for Black Americans. AN: MN030160
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEveryday Life for Black American Adults: Stress, Emotional and Cardiovascular Responsesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158624-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Everyday Life for Black American Adults: Stress, Emotional and Cardiovascular Responses </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Brown, Debra</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 226 Ridge Trail, Chapel Hill, NC, 27516, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to examine the stress process in Black American adults by exploring chronic stress, emotions, age, body mass index, and blood pressure within the context of gender and socioeconomic position (SEP). A sociopsychophysiological framework of Everyday Life for Black American Adults was tested using structural equation modeling. The convenience sample of Black American adults (N=211) ranged from 25 to 79 years of age (M=44.90). Participants were highly educated and almost half was married. Household sizes ranged from one to eight people (M=2.8) with family per capita incomes ranging from zero to $75,000 (M=$18,990). Although chi-square was significant (X2=18.05, df=10, p=.054), the GFI (.98), TLI (.93), and CFI (.98) indexes indicated acceptable fit of the model which explained 27% of the variance in systolic blood pressure and 17% of the variance in diastolic blood pressure. SEP had a significant effect on chronic stress (B=-0.376, p&gt;.001) and chronic stress had a significant effect on negative affect (B=.489, b=1.809, p&lt;.001). Neither SEP, chronic stress, nor emotions had significant effects on blood pressure. Although women had higher negative affect scores than men (B=-.155, b=2.771, p&lt;.01), men&rsquo;s diastolic blood pressures were on average 4 mm Hg higher than women&rsquo;s (B=-.132, b=-3.584, p&lt;.05). Findings indicated that gender, SEP, chronic stress, and emotional responses did not have the expected negative effects on blood pressure in this sample of highly educated, high income Black American adults. These findings are useful to nurses as they develop and implement interventions to eliminate disparities in health for Black Americans. AN: MN030160 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:14:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:14:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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