2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158630
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Breathing Retraining and Exercise in COPD
Abstract:
Breathing Retraining and Exercise in COPD
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Collins, Eileen
Contact Address:Research & Development, R&D (151), Hines, IL, 60141, USA
Co-Authors:W. Langbein; L. Fehr; F. Laghi; C. Bammert; S. O’Connell; Kathleen Hanson; L. Edwards; E. Hagarty
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of employing a computerized breathing training program combined with leg-cycle and strength exercise to improve exertional tolerance, dyspnea and quality of life in persons with COPD. Outcome measures were a) exercise duration on a progressive and constant work rate (CWR) cycle test, b) perceived breathlessness, c) tidal volume (VT) and breathing frequency (b/min), and d) score on the Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire (CRQ). Theoretical Framework: Nagi Disability Model. Subjects: Thirteen males age 68 ± 9 yr (FEV1 1.0 ± 0.43 L, MVV 42 ± 21 L/min, FEV1/FVC 42.5 ± 10.4%) completed the pre-test/post-test study. Methods: Symptom limited cycle tests were repeated at baseline and 6 wk post-training. All completed a 6-wk interval-training program combined with breathing-feedback on a leg-cycle ergometer. Training included 15 min of upper body strength exercises. Breathing-feedback was provided in the form of a computerized incentive system driven by inspiratory and expiratory flows. Results: After 6 wk, exercise duration improved by 110% and 45% on the CWR and progressive leg-cycle tests, respectively. The slopes of the relationship between ratings of perceived dyspnea (Borg ratio scale) and exercise time on the CWR cycle tests for each subject was determined. The pre-training slope of 1.04 ± 1.03 decreased to 0.44 ± 0.4 post-training (P<0.006). After 6 wk breathing frequency declined from 26 ± 5 to 20 ± 5 b/min (24%, P=0.001) and VT increased from 1.2 ± 0.3 L to 1.5 ± 0.6 L (26%, P=0.04) The dyspnea subscale of the CRQ showed a large improvement (effect size eq 1.0). Conclusions: Breathing feedback combined with exercise training was a clinically effective method of pulmonary rehabilitation. Improvements in the exercise tolerance of these subjects were substantially greater than previously reported in the literature. AN: MN030098
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBreathing Retraining and Exercise in COPDen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158630-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Breathing Retraining and Exercise in COPD</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Collins, Eileen</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Research &amp; Development, R&amp;D (151), Hines, IL, 60141, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">W. Langbein; L. Fehr; F. Laghi; C. Bammert; S. O&rsquo;Connell; Kathleen Hanson; L. Edwards; E. Hagarty </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of employing a computerized breathing training program combined with leg-cycle and strength exercise to improve exertional tolerance, dyspnea and quality of life in persons with COPD. Outcome measures were a) exercise duration on a progressive and constant work rate (CWR) cycle test, b) perceived breathlessness, c) tidal volume (VT) and breathing frequency (b/min), and d) score on the Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire (CRQ). Theoretical Framework: Nagi Disability Model. Subjects: Thirteen males age 68 &plusmn; 9 yr (FEV1 1.0 &plusmn; 0.43 L, MVV 42 &plusmn; 21 L/min, FEV1/FVC 42.5 &plusmn; 10.4%) completed the pre-test/post-test study. Methods: Symptom limited cycle tests were repeated at baseline and 6 wk post-training. All completed a 6-wk interval-training program combined with breathing-feedback on a leg-cycle ergometer. Training included 15 min of upper body strength exercises. Breathing-feedback was provided in the form of a computerized incentive system driven by inspiratory and expiratory flows. Results: After 6 wk, exercise duration improved by 110% and 45% on the CWR and progressive leg-cycle tests, respectively. The slopes of the relationship between ratings of perceived dyspnea (Borg ratio scale) and exercise time on the CWR cycle tests for each subject was determined. The pre-training slope of 1.04 &plusmn; 1.03 decreased to 0.44 &plusmn; 0.4 post-training (P&lt;0.006). After 6 wk breathing frequency declined from 26 &plusmn; 5 to 20 &plusmn; 5 b/min (24%, P=0.001) and VT increased from 1.2 &plusmn; 0.3 L to 1.5 &plusmn; 0.6 L (26%, P=0.04) The dyspnea subscale of the CRQ showed a large improvement (effect size eq 1.0). Conclusions: Breathing feedback combined with exercise training was a clinically effective method of pulmonary rehabilitation. Improvements in the exercise tolerance of these subjects were substantially greater than previously reported in the literature. AN: MN030098 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:14:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:14:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.