2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158631
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Randomized Trial of Two Interventions to Increase Older Women's Exercise
Abstract:
Randomized Trial of Two Interventions to Increase Older Women's Exercise
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Conn, Vicki
Contact Address:S317 School of Nursing, MU, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA
Co-Authors:Kathryn Burks
Background: Physical and psychological benefits of increased physical activity have been widely documented among healthy and chronically ill older adults. Despite these benefits, few older adults exercise and women are particularly likely to be sedentary. Research testing interventions with subgroups often not represented in existing research, such as older women, is urgently needed. Purpose: This study tested two interventions to increase older women's physical activity. Conceptual Framework: The interventions were based on the transtheoretical model of health behavior change, social cognitive theory, and the theory of planned behavior. Subjects: Community-dwelling sedentary women aged 65 and over participated in the study (N=190). Design & Methods: A randomized two way factorial experimental design compared the effects of two limited contact interventions, motivational sessions and periodic prompts, among aged women. Participants received either a three-encounter motivational intervention or a control intervention that emphasized exercise benefits. Those randomized to receive prompts also received weekly telephone or mail-delivered exercise prompts. Outcome measures included Physical Activity Scale, Baecke Physical Activity Scale, Ratings of Perceived Exertion, and DigiWalker pedometer scores. Results & Conclusions: The prompting intervention consistently increased exercise and physical activity scores as measured by both self-report instruments and DigiWalker step counters. Prompting did not increase perceived exertion during exercise. The motivational intervention did not affect exercise or physical activity behavior outcome scores. Prompting is a low-cost strategy for increasing exercise and physical activity among older women. Future research should examine alternative modes for prompt delivery. Three motivational sessions without specific reinforcement appear to be inadequate to successfully change exercise behavior among sedentary older women. AN: MN030289
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRandomized Trial of Two Interventions to Increase Older Women's Exerciseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158631-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Randomized Trial of Two Interventions to Increase Older Women's Exercise</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Conn, Vicki</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">S317 School of Nursing, MU, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kathryn Burks </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Physical and psychological benefits of increased physical activity have been widely documented among healthy and chronically ill older adults. Despite these benefits, few older adults exercise and women are particularly likely to be sedentary. Research testing interventions with subgroups often not represented in existing research, such as older women, is urgently needed. Purpose: This study tested two interventions to increase older women's physical activity. Conceptual Framework: The interventions were based on the transtheoretical model of health behavior change, social cognitive theory, and the theory of planned behavior. Subjects: Community-dwelling sedentary women aged 65 and over participated in the study (N=190). Design &amp; Methods: A randomized two way factorial experimental design compared the effects of two limited contact interventions, motivational sessions and periodic prompts, among aged women. Participants received either a three-encounter motivational intervention or a control intervention that emphasized exercise benefits. Those randomized to receive prompts also received weekly telephone or mail-delivered exercise prompts. Outcome measures included Physical Activity Scale, Baecke Physical Activity Scale, Ratings of Perceived Exertion, and DigiWalker pedometer scores. Results &amp; Conclusions: The prompting intervention consistently increased exercise and physical activity scores as measured by both self-report instruments and DigiWalker step counters. Prompting did not increase perceived exertion during exercise. The motivational intervention did not affect exercise or physical activity behavior outcome scores. Prompting is a low-cost strategy for increasing exercise and physical activity among older women. Future research should examine alternative modes for prompt delivery. Three motivational sessions without specific reinforcement appear to be inadequate to successfully change exercise behavior among sedentary older women. AN: MN030289</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:14:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:14:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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