Effect of Emergency Department Environment and Elderly Participant Characteristics on Data Quality

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158633
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effect of Emergency Department Environment and Elderly Participant Characteristics on Data Quality
Abstract:
Effect of Emergency Department Environment and Elderly Participant Characteristics on Data Quality
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Drew, Barbara
Contact Address:CON, 7410 Myrna Avenue, Kent, OH, 44240, USA
Co-Authors:Lorraine C. Mion; Stephen W. Meldon
Background: Applicability of findings to practice requires that research be conducted in clinical settings. Some settings may be more stress producing for research participants than others due to the nature of the environment (e.g. noise levels and lack of privacy) and/or to participant characteristics (e.g. severity of illness or cognitive status). Stressors may influence the quality of self-reports collected during a research interview especially when the participants are elderly. Purpose: The purpose of this portion of a larger study was to assess the influence of the emergency department (ED) environment and participant characteristics on the accuracy of self-reported health care utilization. Methods: 650 elders, ages 65-98, or their proxies were interviewed in two urban EDs to obtain baseline data for a RCT which tested the effectiveness of a transitional model of care on reducing subsequent service utilization. Significant others acted as proxies if the Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire (SPMSQ) score was < 5 correct (f=38). The research assistant, upon completion of each interview, rated environmental characteristics. Self-reports of ED use and hospitalization during the previous 4 weeks were compared with data collected by research assistants from participants' hospital records. Results: 1% over-reported and 15.5% under-reported visits to the ED. Regarding hospitalizations, 1% over-reported and 8% under-reported. Among patient respondents, discrepancies were associated with cognitive deficits as measured by the number of items correct on the SPMSQ (OR=.83, 95% CI=.71, .97, p=.02) and by triage nurse assessment of cognitive impairment (OR=2.82 [1.24, 6.45], p=.01). Inconsistencies, however, were not related to any other patient characteristic or any of the environmental variables. Conclusion: These findings suggest that elders, without cognitive decline, report reliable data even in a challenging environment. AN: MN030140
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffect of Emergency Department Environment and Elderly Participant Characteristics on Data Qualityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158633-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effect of Emergency Department Environment and Elderly Participant Characteristics on Data Quality </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Drew, Barbara</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 7410 Myrna Avenue, Kent, OH, 44240, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lorraine C. Mion; Stephen W. Meldon</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Applicability of findings to practice requires that research be conducted in clinical settings. Some settings may be more stress producing for research participants than others due to the nature of the environment (e.g. noise levels and lack of privacy) and/or to participant characteristics (e.g. severity of illness or cognitive status). Stressors may influence the quality of self-reports collected during a research interview especially when the participants are elderly. Purpose: The purpose of this portion of a larger study was to assess the influence of the emergency department (ED) environment and participant characteristics on the accuracy of self-reported health care utilization. Methods: 650 elders, ages 65-98, or their proxies were interviewed in two urban EDs to obtain baseline data for a RCT which tested the effectiveness of a transitional model of care on reducing subsequent service utilization. Significant others acted as proxies if the Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire (SPMSQ) score was &lt; 5 correct (f=38). The research assistant, upon completion of each interview, rated environmental characteristics. Self-reports of ED use and hospitalization during the previous 4 weeks were compared with data collected by research assistants from participants' hospital records. Results: 1% over-reported and 15.5% under-reported visits to the ED. Regarding hospitalizations, 1% over-reported and 8% under-reported. Among patient respondents, discrepancies were associated with cognitive deficits as measured by the number of items correct on the SPMSQ (OR=.83, 95% CI=.71, .97, p=.02) and by triage nurse assessment of cognitive impairment (OR=2.82 [1.24, 6.45], p=.01). Inconsistencies, however, were not related to any other patient characteristic or any of the environmental variables. Conclusion: These findings suggest that elders, without cognitive decline, report reliable data even in a challenging environment. AN: MN030140 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:14:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:14:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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