Comparison of Two Pain Management Strategies during Chest Tube Removal: Relaxation with Narcotics and Narcotics Alone

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158635
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparison of Two Pain Management Strategies during Chest Tube Removal: Relaxation with Narcotics and Narcotics Alone
Abstract:
Comparison of Two Pain Management Strategies during Chest Tube Removal: Relaxation with Narcotics and Narcotics Alone
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Friesner, Stacy
Contact Address:College of Nursing & Health, 1130 Alger Road, Harrod, OH, 45850, USA
Pain from the removal of chest tubes after open-heart surgery is severe and described as one of the most memorable painful experiences for those who undergo open heart surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the use of a slow deep breathing relaxation exercise when used as an adjunct to narcotic analgesia decreases pain during chest tube removal (CTR). Gate control theory served as the theoretical framework for this study with distraction “closing the gate” to pain A convenience sample of 40 adult open-heart patients was recruited from three separate acute care settings. Subjects were randomly assigned to either receiving the relaxation with analgesia or analgesia only. Subjects were also matched for age and gender. Pain measurements were evaluated with a 10-cm Visual Analog Scale and validated with an 11-point Verbal Numeric Rating Scale 15 minutes prior to, immediately after, and 15 minutes after chest tube removal (CTR). The variables of narcotic level and duration of chest tube placement were statistically controlled. In addition the effects of additional confounding variables, including the use of salicylates and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, individual differences in drug metabolism and excretion, and variances in technique with insertion and removal were limited through randomization. With repeated measure of analysis of covariance (MANCOVA), the relaxation treatment was found to have a significant impact on pain ratings. While pain ratings did increase for both groups immediately after CTR, the pain ratings were significantly lower within the treatment group (p=.006). As subjects within the treatment group continued with the relaxation treatment after CTR, follow-up pain ratings 15 minutes later remained significantly lower in the treatment group (p=.004). This study supports the use of a slow deep breathing relaxation exercise with the use of narcotics for pain control among open heart surgical patients when having their chest tubes removed. AN: MN030009
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComparison of Two Pain Management Strategies during Chest Tube Removal: Relaxation with Narcotics and Narcotics Aloneen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158635-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Comparison of Two Pain Management Strategies during Chest Tube Removal: Relaxation with Narcotics and Narcotics Alone </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Friesner, Stacy</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing &amp; Health, 1130 Alger Road, Harrod, OH, 45850, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Pain from the removal of chest tubes after open-heart surgery is severe and described as one of the most memorable painful experiences for those who undergo open heart surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the use of a slow deep breathing relaxation exercise when used as an adjunct to narcotic analgesia decreases pain during chest tube removal (CTR). Gate control theory served as the theoretical framework for this study with distraction &ldquo;closing the gate&rdquo; to pain A convenience sample of 40 adult open-heart patients was recruited from three separate acute care settings. Subjects were randomly assigned to either receiving the relaxation with analgesia or analgesia only. Subjects were also matched for age and gender. Pain measurements were evaluated with a 10-cm Visual Analog Scale and validated with an 11-point Verbal Numeric Rating Scale 15 minutes prior to, immediately after, and 15 minutes after chest tube removal (CTR). The variables of narcotic level and duration of chest tube placement were statistically controlled. In addition the effects of additional confounding variables, including the use of salicylates and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, individual differences in drug metabolism and excretion, and variances in technique with insertion and removal were limited through randomization. With repeated measure of analysis of covariance (MANCOVA), the relaxation treatment was found to have a significant impact on pain ratings. While pain ratings did increase for both groups immediately after CTR, the pain ratings were significantly lower within the treatment group (p=.006). As subjects within the treatment group continued with the relaxation treatment after CTR, follow-up pain ratings 15 minutes later remained significantly lower in the treatment group (p=.004). This study supports the use of a slow deep breathing relaxation exercise with the use of narcotics for pain control among open heart surgical patients when having their chest tubes removed. AN: MN030009</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:14:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:14:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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