Stress, Fatigue and Sleep Difficulty in Lactating Mothers of Term & Very Preterm Infants during the First 6 Weeks Post Delivery

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158636
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Stress, Fatigue and Sleep Difficulty in Lactating Mothers of Term & Very Preterm Infants during the First 6 Weeks Post Delivery
Abstract:
Stress, Fatigue and Sleep Difficulty in Lactating Mothers of Term & Very Preterm Infants during the First 6 Weeks Post Delivery
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Hill, Pamela
Contact Address:CON, 1515 5th Avenue, Moline, IL, 61265, USA
Co-Authors:Jean C. Aldag; Robert T. Chatterton
Perceived maternal stress, fatigue and sleep difficulty were studied during the first 6 weeks following delivery for a convenient sample of term (n=66) and very preterm (n=50) infants. The Elliot & Eisdorfer (1982) stress model served as the foundation for this study. The stress continuum includes the potential stressor (e.g. birth of an infant), mediators such as personal and social characteristics, the psychologic reactions (e.g. anxiety, depression, hostility), the biologic reactions (e.g. catecholamines) with the outcome milk production. Mothers who participated were drug and smoke free, intending to lactate for at least 12 weeks. Mothers spoke English or Spanish and had a telephone. A perceived stress and fatigue visual analogue scale, and the Richards-Campbell Sleep Questionnaire were completed daily. Spearman correlations and repeated measures general linear model of SPSS was used to examine scores aggregated by week for the 6 weeks. Adjacent weeks scores for all three variables were moderately correlated, .61 to .88. There were no group differences for stress and fatigue; however, term mothers had significantly (p=.007) greater sleep difficulty than preterm mothers. Perceived stress, fatigue and sleep difficulty declined significantly and linearly over the 6 weeks for term mothers. For mothers of preterm infants the significant trend was quadratic for fatigue and sleep difficulty with a 4th order for perceived stress with week 6 scores similar to week 1. Perceived stress, fatigue and sleep difficulty, declined over the 6 weeks for lactating mothers of healthy term infants, but not for mothers of very preterm infant. The findings support the need for the development of interventions that address alleviation of perceived stress, fatigue, and sleep difficulty especially in mothers of a very preterm infant. AN: MN030334
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStress, Fatigue and Sleep Difficulty in Lactating Mothers of Term & Very Preterm Infants during the First 6 Weeks Post Deliveryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158636-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Stress, Fatigue and Sleep Difficulty in Lactating Mothers of Term &amp; Very Preterm Infants during the First 6 Weeks Post Delivery </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hill, Pamela</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 1515 5th Avenue, Moline, IL, 61265, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jean C. Aldag; Robert T. Chatterton</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Perceived maternal stress, fatigue and sleep difficulty were studied during the first 6 weeks following delivery for a convenient sample of term (n=66) and very preterm (n=50) infants. The Elliot &amp; Eisdorfer (1982) stress model served as the foundation for this study. The stress continuum includes the potential stressor (e.g. birth of an infant), mediators such as personal and social characteristics, the psychologic reactions (e.g. anxiety, depression, hostility), the biologic reactions (e.g. catecholamines) with the outcome milk production. Mothers who participated were drug and smoke free, intending to lactate for at least 12 weeks. Mothers spoke English or Spanish and had a telephone. A perceived stress and fatigue visual analogue scale, and the Richards-Campbell Sleep Questionnaire were completed daily. Spearman correlations and repeated measures general linear model of SPSS was used to examine scores aggregated by week for the 6 weeks. Adjacent weeks scores for all three variables were moderately correlated, .61 to .88. There were no group differences for stress and fatigue; however, term mothers had significantly (p=.007) greater sleep difficulty than preterm mothers. Perceived stress, fatigue and sleep difficulty declined significantly and linearly over the 6 weeks for term mothers. For mothers of preterm infants the significant trend was quadratic for fatigue and sleep difficulty with a 4th order for perceived stress with week 6 scores similar to week 1. Perceived stress, fatigue and sleep difficulty, declined over the 6 weeks for lactating mothers of healthy term infants, but not for mothers of very preterm infant. The findings support the need for the development of interventions that address alleviation of perceived stress, fatigue, and sleep difficulty especially in mothers of a very preterm infant. AN: MN030334 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:14:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:14:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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