Kcal Restriction, Exercise and Low Fat Diet Improve Insulin Sensitivity in Genetically Obese Rats

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158638
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Kcal Restriction, Exercise and Low Fat Diet Improve Insulin Sensitivity in Genetically Obese Rats
Abstract:
Kcal Restriction, Exercise and Low Fat Diet Improve Insulin Sensitivity in Genetically Obese Rats
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Jarosz, Patricia
Contact Address:CON, 5557 Cass, Detroit, MI, 48202,, USA
Co-Authors:Bonnie L. Metzger
Obesity, which has become a pandemic in the 21st century, is associated with serious negative health consequences including type II diabetes. Diet, exercise, and weight loss can improve health and are still the mainstays of prevention and treatment of this public health concern. This study examined the biological effects of these treatment modalities on insulin sensitivity in an animal model of genetic obesity. 15 male adult genetically obese Zucker rats randomly assigned to an exercise protocol (swimming vs. sedentary) freely consumed a low fat diet or the high fat diet which contributes to dietary induced obesity (DIO) for 6 weeks. For another 6 weeks, rats continued their assigned exercise protocol but all rats consumed a low fat, kilocalorie (Kcal) restricted diet. Two measures of insulin sensitivity were examined. Serum insulin levels were studied initially, after free feeding, and after Kcal restriction. An insulin sensitivity test was conducted after free feeding and after Kcal restriction. Serum insulin levels, which are an indirect estimate of insulin sensitivity, were significantly influenced by high fat diets (DIO). High fat diets significantly increased insulin levels more than 100uU/l, alone. Kcal restriction and change to a low fat diet was sufficient to return insulin to control levels. In the absence of DIO, swimming with Kcal restriction will reduce insulin levels towards baseline. These findings were further supported by a more direct measure of glucose metabolism response to insulin, the insulin sensitivity test. However, swimmers were more sensitive to the action of insulin on glucose regardless of diet type (70 mg/dl vs. 30 mg/dl). This work supports the assumption that high fat diets alone have a significant impact on insulin sensitivity in this model of genetic obesity. AN: MN030206
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleKcal Restriction, Exercise and Low Fat Diet Improve Insulin Sensitivity in Genetically Obese Ratsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158638-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Kcal Restriction, Exercise and Low Fat Diet Improve Insulin Sensitivity in Genetically Obese Rats </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jarosz, Patricia</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 5557 Cass, Detroit, MI, 48202,, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Bonnie L. Metzger</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Obesity, which has become a pandemic in the 21st century, is associated with serious negative health consequences including type II diabetes. Diet, exercise, and weight loss can improve health and are still the mainstays of prevention and treatment of this public health concern. This study examined the biological effects of these treatment modalities on insulin sensitivity in an animal model of genetic obesity. 15 male adult genetically obese Zucker rats randomly assigned to an exercise protocol (swimming vs. sedentary) freely consumed a low fat diet or the high fat diet which contributes to dietary induced obesity (DIO) for 6 weeks. For another 6 weeks, rats continued their assigned exercise protocol but all rats consumed a low fat, kilocalorie (Kcal) restricted diet. Two measures of insulin sensitivity were examined. Serum insulin levels were studied initially, after free feeding, and after Kcal restriction. An insulin sensitivity test was conducted after free feeding and after Kcal restriction. Serum insulin levels, which are an indirect estimate of insulin sensitivity, were significantly influenced by high fat diets (DIO). High fat diets significantly increased insulin levels more than 100uU/l, alone. Kcal restriction and change to a low fat diet was sufficient to return insulin to control levels. In the absence of DIO, swimming with Kcal restriction will reduce insulin levels towards baseline. These findings were further supported by a more direct measure of glucose metabolism response to insulin, the insulin sensitivity test. However, swimmers were more sensitive to the action of insulin on glucose regardless of diet type (70 mg/dl vs. 30 mg/dl). This work supports the assumption that high fat diets alone have a significant impact on insulin sensitivity in this model of genetic obesity. AN: MN030206</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:15:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:15:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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