The Phases of Suffering Experienced by Critical Care Nurses in Association with Difficult End-of-Life Situations

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158639
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Phases of Suffering Experienced by Critical Care Nurses in Association with Difficult End-of-Life Situations
Abstract:
The Phases of Suffering Experienced by Critical Care Nurses in Association with Difficult End-of-Life Situations
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Jezuit, Deborah
Contact Address:1910 Stoneheather Avenue, Aurora, IL, 60504, USA
Critical care nurses are regularly confronted by difficult end-of-life (EOL) situations and frequently experience emotions during the situations that can be conceptually defined as suffering. Nurses are often unaware that these feelings constitute suffering and are unaware of the variables contributing to the feelings, mechanisms to relieve suffering or the consequences of unrelieved suffering. Soell (1975) described that the progression through three phases of suffering could alleviate the suffering. However, these phases have never been investigated. The purpose of this study was to identify, describe, and analyze the variables contributing to nurse suffering and the phases of suffering experienced by nurses in response to difficult EOL situations in a critical care setting. A grounded theory method was implemented to investigate the critical care nurses’ experiences with difficult EOL situations and progression through the phases of suffering. From a population of members belonging to a national organization, a random convenience sample of 10 female critical care nurses, who worked in a variety of Midwest hospitals, participated in semi-structured, audio taped interviews. A theoretical model describing the nurses’ progression through the phases of suffering was generated. While the nurses defined suffering, 70% did not identify that they suffered. Variables that influenced the nurses’ suffering included: conflict, unexpected death, personalizing, and unrealized ideals/goals. In analyzing Soell’s phases, six nurses described experiencing mute suffering and eight nurses described experiencing expressive suffering although none of the nurses discussed their feelings. Nine nurses expressed experiencing the new idea phase of suffering. Since the consequences of unrelieved suffering described by the nurses included unresolved emotions, and changing jobs, solutions to nurse suffering should address these factors. Recommendations include administrative support, ethics consultations, psychological support, debriefing, education, empowerment and a supportive environment. AN: MN030352
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Phases of Suffering Experienced by Critical Care Nurses in Association with Difficult End-of-Life Situationsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158639-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Phases of Suffering Experienced by Critical Care Nurses in Association with Difficult End-of-Life Situations </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jezuit, Deborah</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1910 Stoneheather Avenue, Aurora, IL, 60504, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Critical care nurses are regularly confronted by difficult end-of-life (EOL) situations and frequently experience emotions during the situations that can be conceptually defined as suffering. Nurses are often unaware that these feelings constitute suffering and are unaware of the variables contributing to the feelings, mechanisms to relieve suffering or the consequences of unrelieved suffering. Soell (1975) described that the progression through three phases of suffering could alleviate the suffering. However, these phases have never been investigated. The purpose of this study was to identify, describe, and analyze the variables contributing to nurse suffering and the phases of suffering experienced by nurses in response to difficult EOL situations in a critical care setting. A grounded theory method was implemented to investigate the critical care nurses&rsquo; experiences with difficult EOL situations and progression through the phases of suffering. From a population of members belonging to a national organization, a random convenience sample of 10 female critical care nurses, who worked in a variety of Midwest hospitals, participated in semi-structured, audio taped interviews. A theoretical model describing the nurses&rsquo; progression through the phases of suffering was generated. While the nurses defined suffering, 70% did not identify that they suffered. Variables that influenced the nurses&rsquo; suffering included: conflict, unexpected death, personalizing, and unrealized ideals/goals. In analyzing Soell&rsquo;s phases, six nurses described experiencing mute suffering and eight nurses described experiencing expressive suffering although none of the nurses discussed their feelings. Nine nurses expressed experiencing the new idea phase of suffering. Since the consequences of unrelieved suffering described by the nurses included unresolved emotions, and changing jobs, solutions to nurse suffering should address these factors. Recommendations include administrative support, ethics consultations, psychological support, debriefing, education, empowerment and a supportive environment. AN: MN030352 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:15:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:15:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.