2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158644
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Dose Response to IL-1b in Brown-Norway Rats
Abstract:
Dose Response to IL-1b in Brown-Norway Rats
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Kupferschmid, Barbara
Contact Address:SON, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, MIB C126 Box 0820, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA
Co-Authors:Barbara Therrien
Infectious disease accounts for considerable mortality and morbidity worldwide, particularly in the elderly. Sickness behaviors, including fever, anorexia, decreased activity and weight loss, result from a cytokine cascade that activates the immune system. Cytokines also engage the nervous system yet little is known about patterns and duration of cognitive or behavioral changes. IL-1b predominantly mediates central effects. Prior to cognitive testing, this preliminary study was necessary to determine the dose of IL-1b that would elicit sickness behaviors in an established animal model of aging, the Brown-Norway rat. Adult (n=5) and aged (n=5) Brown-Norway male rats were randomly assigned to a control or experimental group. Experimental animals received high (5000ng or 6000ng) or low (3000ng or 4000ng) doses of IL-1b IP; controls received vehicle. Temperature and motor activity were measured continuously via implanted biotelemetry. Food intake and weight were measured daily. Data analysis revealed temperature increases from .1 to 1.5 degrees Celsius in experimental animals; young animals responded more dramatically to lower doses whereas old responded similarly to high and low doses. Temperature peaked within one hour of injection but was not sustained beyond two hours. Both experimental groups and controls lost weight (4.2 – 5.1 grams) over the first 24 hours; of interest, animals receiving low dose IL-1b lost the most weight, 7.2 grams. Experimental animals consumed less food the day of injection. No differences in motor activity were found. The data suggest either dose is sufficient to increase temperature but elevations are short-lived; there is a dose response in young animals. Low doses effectively decrease weight and food intake. We conclude that the Brown-Norway rat may be more resistant to IL-1b than other animal models. AN: MN030135
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDose Response to IL-1b in Brown-Norway Ratsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158644-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Dose Response to IL-1b in Brown-Norway Rats </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kupferschmid, Barbara</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, MIB C126 Box 0820, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Barbara Therrien</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Infectious disease accounts for considerable mortality and morbidity worldwide, particularly in the elderly. Sickness behaviors, including fever, anorexia, decreased activity and weight loss, result from a cytokine cascade that activates the immune system. Cytokines also engage the nervous system yet little is known about patterns and duration of cognitive or behavioral changes. IL-1b predominantly mediates central effects. Prior to cognitive testing, this preliminary study was necessary to determine the dose of IL-1b that would elicit sickness behaviors in an established animal model of aging, the Brown-Norway rat. Adult (n=5) and aged (n=5) Brown-Norway male rats were randomly assigned to a control or experimental group. Experimental animals received high (5000ng or 6000ng) or low (3000ng or 4000ng) doses of IL-1b IP; controls received vehicle. Temperature and motor activity were measured continuously via implanted biotelemetry. Food intake and weight were measured daily. Data analysis revealed temperature increases from .1 to 1.5 degrees Celsius in experimental animals; young animals responded more dramatically to lower doses whereas old responded similarly to high and low doses. Temperature peaked within one hour of injection but was not sustained beyond two hours. Both experimental groups and controls lost weight (4.2 &ndash; 5.1 grams) over the first 24 hours; of interest, animals receiving low dose IL-1b lost the most weight, 7.2 grams. Experimental animals consumed less food the day of injection. No differences in motor activity were found. The data suggest either dose is sufficient to increase temperature but elevations are short-lived; there is a dose response in young animals. Low doses effectively decrease weight and food intake. We conclude that the Brown-Norway rat may be more resistant to IL-1b than other animal models. AN: MN030135</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:15:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:15:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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