2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158647
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Women's and Men's Exercise for Secondary Prevention Following Cardiac Events
Abstract:
Women's and Men's Exercise for Secondary Prevention Following Cardiac Events
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Moore, Shirley
Contact Address:SON, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA
Co-Authors:Jacqueline Charvat; Beverly L. Roberts; Mary A. Dolansky;, Ahmad Al-Duhoun; Siobhan M. Martin
Maintaining long-term aerobic exercise remains problematic for cardiac patients. The purpose of this prospective study was to compare patterns of exercise at 2, 4 and 6 months following cardiac rehabilitation (CR) between men and women. A convenience sample of 97 individuals (30 women, 67 men; mean age=62 years) wore portable wristwatch heart rate monitors during exercise for six months following CR. Exercise outcomes were: exercise frequency, exercise amount (# of hours exercised), length of exercise sessions, and intensity (percent of time in target heart rate {THR} zone). Of 97 individuals who began the study, 77 (79%) continued exercising into Month 2 and by Month 6, 65 (67%) subjects continued exercising. Exercise frequency (12 sessions/ month), length of exercise sessions (mean=56 minutes), and amount of exercise (11 hours/month) remained stable over the study period. Women had slightly fewer sessions and of shorter length than men. However, both men and women had a downward trajectory in the percent of time spent in THR zones, with women spending less time exercising at their THR than men (25% and 37% at Month 2 and 14% and 29% at Month 6, respectively). Slope analysis was undertaken to determine if there were differences by gender in the downward trajectory of exercise intensity. Although women's exercise intensity was less than men's throughout the study period, there was no significant difference in the slope changes, thus men and women's exercise decreased at the same rate. Unfortunately, nearly one-third of CR participants are not exercising at all 6 months after completion of CR and that even among those who do exercise, the frequency and intensity is lower than recommended. Consistent with models of social learning theory (Becker, 1989), understanding patterns of exercise behavior will assist clinicians to target interventions appropriately over time for women and men. AN: MN030385
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWomen's and Men's Exercise for Secondary Prevention Following Cardiac Eventsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158647-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Women's and Men's Exercise for Secondary Prevention Following Cardiac Events </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Moore, Shirley</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jacqueline Charvat; Beverly L. Roberts; Mary A. Dolansky;, Ahmad Al-Duhoun; Siobhan M. Martin </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Maintaining long-term aerobic exercise remains problematic for cardiac patients. The purpose of this prospective study was to compare patterns of exercise at 2, 4 and 6 months following cardiac rehabilitation (CR) between men and women. A convenience sample of 97 individuals (30 women, 67 men; mean age=62 years) wore portable wristwatch heart rate monitors during exercise for six months following CR. Exercise outcomes were: exercise frequency, exercise amount (# of hours exercised), length of exercise sessions, and intensity (percent of time in target heart rate {THR} zone). Of 97 individuals who began the study, 77 (79%) continued exercising into Month 2 and by Month 6, 65 (67%) subjects continued exercising. Exercise frequency (12 sessions/ month), length of exercise sessions (mean=56 minutes), and amount of exercise (11 hours/month) remained stable over the study period. Women had slightly fewer sessions and of shorter length than men. However, both men and women had a downward trajectory in the percent of time spent in THR zones, with women spending less time exercising at their THR than men (25% and 37% at Month 2 and 14% and 29% at Month 6, respectively). Slope analysis was undertaken to determine if there were differences by gender in the downward trajectory of exercise intensity. Although women's exercise intensity was less than men's throughout the study period, there was no significant difference in the slope changes, thus men and women's exercise decreased at the same rate. Unfortunately, nearly one-third of CR participants are not exercising at all 6 months after completion of CR and that even among those who do exercise, the frequency and intensity is lower than recommended. Consistent with models of social learning theory (Becker, 1989), understanding patterns of exercise behavior will assist clinicians to target interventions appropriately over time for women and men. AN: MN030385 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:15:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:15:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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