2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158648
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Exploring Health Care Needs for Women in Abusive Relationships in Japan
Abstract:
Exploring Health Care Needs for Women in Abusive Relationships in Japan
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Nemoto, Keiko
Contact Address:SON, K6/257 Center Health Science , 600 Highland Ave, Madison, WI, 53792-2455, USA
Co-Authors:Rachel Rodriguez; Lucy Mkandawire
This qualitative study explored battered women’s needs related to health care services in Japan. Current research has shown that domestic violence (DV) is a problem that leads to severe health consequences for battered women. There is, however, a lack of recognition of DV as a public health problem in Japan, and formal clinical guidelines related to DV have yet to be proposed. Most health care providers in Japan consider DV to be a private matter that should stay within the family. They may even blame women for provoking the violence. A feminist action research approach was employed as a framework for the study. A non-governmental organization working on DV in the greater Tokyo area collaborated with the principal investigator (PI). Participants living in the greater Tokyo area were recruited through advertisements. Six battered women participated in the study. Two individual interviews and one focus group interview were conducted using a semi-structured interview guide. They were asked about both their positive and negative experiences with health care providers, barriers that they faced when accessing health care services, and their expectations regarding their encounters with health care providers. All interviews were conducted in Japanese. The interviews were audiotaped and transcribed by the PI. Content analysis was used to identify relevant themes. The results showed that participants had difficulties when accessing health care services because health care providers 1) did not acknowledge the problem of DV as they believed that home is the safest place for a wife, 2) ignored DV even when the women explicitly stated that the problem was DV related, and 3) focused only on the women’s physical concerns but not on their mental health. Changes in health care policy in Japan such as requiring that all health care providers receive training in DV are proposed based on this study. AN: MN030020
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExploring Health Care Needs for Women in Abusive Relationships in Japanen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158648-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Exploring Health Care Needs for Women in Abusive Relationships in Japan </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Nemoto, Keiko</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, K6/257 Center Health Science , 600 Highland Ave, Madison, WI, 53792-2455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Rachel Rodriguez; Lucy Mkandawire</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This qualitative study explored battered women&rsquo;s needs related to health care services in Japan. Current research has shown that domestic violence (DV) is a problem that leads to severe health consequences for battered women. There is, however, a lack of recognition of DV as a public health problem in Japan, and formal clinical guidelines related to DV have yet to be proposed. Most health care providers in Japan consider DV to be a private matter that should stay within the family. They may even blame women for provoking the violence. A feminist action research approach was employed as a framework for the study. A non-governmental organization working on DV in the greater Tokyo area collaborated with the principal investigator (PI). Participants living in the greater Tokyo area were recruited through advertisements. Six battered women participated in the study. Two individual interviews and one focus group interview were conducted using a semi-structured interview guide. They were asked about both their positive and negative experiences with health care providers, barriers that they faced when accessing health care services, and their expectations regarding their encounters with health care providers. All interviews were conducted in Japanese. The interviews were audiotaped and transcribed by the PI. Content analysis was used to identify relevant themes. The results showed that participants had difficulties when accessing health care services because health care providers 1) did not acknowledge the problem of DV as they believed that home is the safest place for a wife, 2) ignored DV even when the women explicitly stated that the problem was DV related, and 3) focused only on the women&rsquo;s physical concerns but not on their mental health. Changes in health care policy in Japan such as requiring that all health care providers receive training in DV are proposed based on this study. AN: MN030020 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:15:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:15:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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