Korean and U.S. Family Caregivers' Involvement in Care for Institutionalized Elders with Dementia

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158649
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Korean and U.S. Family Caregivers' Involvement in Care for Institutionalized Elders with Dementia
Abstract:
Korean and U.S. Family Caregivers' Involvement in Care for Institutionalized Elders with Dementia
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Park, Myong-Hwa
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 194 Dongsan-dong, Daegu, 700-712,, South Korea
Co-Authors:Meridean Maas; Janet Specht
The purpose of this study was to describe Korean and US family members actual involvement in care family involvement in care for their elders with dementia in long-term dementia care units. A purposive sample of 94 Korean family members participated in the study. Self-administered questionnaires were used. Family members involvement in care was measured by the percentage of family members who were involved in each activity. Cross-cultural differences were examined using US baseline date from Family Involvement in Care (FIC) intervention study (Maas et al., 2000). Findings from the study can be summarized as follows: Family caregivers were most involved in monitoring the care provided in the facilities (70% of Korean and 65% of US family caregivers). Both Korean and US family caregivers had major involvement in social-emotional activities (Korea=48%, US=53%). Korean family caregivers were least involved in directing the care in the facilities (26%), while US caregivers were least involved in activities of daily living (28%). Korean family caregivers (4%) showed the lowest participation rate in "sending letters or card to their relatives," compared to 22% of US caregivers. Korean family caregivers were least involved in directing care, and US family caregivers were least involved in activities of daily living. Korean family members wanted to be involved in care in a more passive way and without outward conflict with staff members. There were also some cultural differences between Korea and US groups in the activities that family members were most involved in. For example, Korean caregivers reported a relatively low rate of sending letters or cards. That is not a common practice among the older generations in Korea. Korean family caregivers also reported considerably lower participation in financial management for patients. This study provided the useful cultural information of Korean and U.S. family involvement in care. AN: MN030209
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleKorean and U.S. Family Caregivers' Involvement in Care for Institutionalized Elders with Dementiaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158649-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Korean and U.S. Family Caregivers' Involvement in Care for Institutionalized Elders with Dementia </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Park, Myong-Hwa</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 194 Dongsan-dong, Daegu, 700-712,, South Korea</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Meridean Maas; Janet Specht</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to describe Korean and US family members actual involvement in care family involvement in care for their elders with dementia in long-term dementia care units. A purposive sample of 94 Korean family members participated in the study. Self-administered questionnaires were used. Family members involvement in care was measured by the percentage of family members who were involved in each activity. Cross-cultural differences were examined using US baseline date from Family Involvement in Care (FIC) intervention study (Maas et al., 2000). Findings from the study can be summarized as follows: Family caregivers were most involved in monitoring the care provided in the facilities (70% of Korean and 65% of US family caregivers). Both Korean and US family caregivers had major involvement in social-emotional activities (Korea=48%, US=53%). Korean family caregivers were least involved in directing the care in the facilities (26%), while US caregivers were least involved in activities of daily living (28%). Korean family caregivers (4%) showed the lowest participation rate in &quot;sending letters or card to their relatives,&quot; compared to 22% of US caregivers. Korean family caregivers were least involved in directing care, and US family caregivers were least involved in activities of daily living. Korean family members wanted to be involved in care in a more passive way and without outward conflict with staff members. There were also some cultural differences between Korea and US groups in the activities that family members were most involved in. For example, Korean caregivers reported a relatively low rate of sending letters or cards. That is not a common practice among the older generations in Korea. Korean family caregivers also reported considerably lower participation in financial management for patients. This study provided the useful cultural information of Korean and U.S. family involvement in care. AN: MN030209 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:15:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:15:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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