2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158650
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Skip to "the loo", my darlin': Urinary Incontinence 1850-2002
Abstract:
Skip to "the loo", my darlin': Urinary Incontinence 1850-2002
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Phillips, Barbara
P.I. Institution Name:Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing
Contact Address:77 Glades Road, PO Box 3091, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, USA
Purpose: To propel the reader back in time to the mid 1800s and then to journey forward to the present by looking at recorded knowledge of urinary incontinence (UI) and prevailing interventions. Rationale and Significance: UI has been a significant social and medical problem from the earliest time of recorded interventions. The 2002 economic burden of UI is estimated at 1.2 billion dollars with a predicted increase to 2.2 billion dollars by 2040. The toll in human suffering can only be speculated upon. Although UI is not limited to the elderly, it is a symptom commonly found in the geriatric community and one that leads to decreased independence and socialization, skin impairment, embarrassment, and significant financial hardships. Methodology and Sources: A descriptive historical journey into the nursing and medical literature. Primary and secondary sources were used including textbooks, journals, articles, drawings, photographs, and original prescriptions. The development of theories, treatments, and interventions for UI from 1850 through the present was examined. Social context was interwoven while looking at the development of medicine and the rise of the art and science of nursing. Attitudes held towards the development of nursing under the aegis of medicine color the entire article. Findings: UI affects women in significantly greater numbers than men, although the interventions were most commonly targeted to males. In addition, two themes: human suffering resulting from urinary incontinence; and the illumination of the necessity of meticulous skin care, emerged throughout the eras. Conclusions: The Continence Nurse has taken her place in the medical community. The NIH has listed UI research as an objective for 2000-2004. Medicine is looking at continence care as a specialty. The consensus is that an aggressive approach toward diagnosis and management will greatly decrease the cost burden and improve the quality of life of the patient. AN: MN030328
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSkip to "the loo", my darlin': Urinary Incontinence 1850-2002en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158650-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Skip to &quot;the loo&quot;, my darlin': Urinary Incontinence 1850-2002</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Phillips, Barbara</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">77 Glades Road, PO Box 3091, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To propel the reader back in time to the mid 1800s and then to journey forward to the present by looking at recorded knowledge of urinary incontinence (UI) and prevailing interventions. Rationale and Significance: UI has been a significant social and medical problem from the earliest time of recorded interventions. The 2002 economic burden of UI is estimated at 1.2 billion dollars with a predicted increase to 2.2 billion dollars by 2040. The toll in human suffering can only be speculated upon. Although UI is not limited to the elderly, it is a symptom commonly found in the geriatric community and one that leads to decreased independence and socialization, skin impairment, embarrassment, and significant financial hardships. Methodology and Sources: A descriptive historical journey into the nursing and medical literature. Primary and secondary sources were used including textbooks, journals, articles, drawings, photographs, and original prescriptions. The development of theories, treatments, and interventions for UI from 1850 through the present was examined. Social context was interwoven while looking at the development of medicine and the rise of the art and science of nursing. Attitudes held towards the development of nursing under the aegis of medicine color the entire article. Findings: UI affects women in significantly greater numbers than men, although the interventions were most commonly targeted to males. In addition, two themes: human suffering resulting from urinary incontinence; and the illumination of the necessity of meticulous skin care, emerged throughout the eras. Conclusions: The Continence Nurse has taken her place in the medical community. The NIH has listed UI research as an objective for 2000-2004. Medicine is looking at continence care as a specialty. The consensus is that an aggressive approach toward diagnosis and management will greatly decrease the cost burden and improve the quality of life of the patient. AN: MN030328</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:15:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:15:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.