Psychological Stress and Cytokine Production in Multiple Sclerosis: Correlation with Disease Symptomatology

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158652
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Psychological Stress and Cytokine Production in Multiple Sclerosis: Correlation with Disease Symptomatology
Abstract:
Psychological Stress and Cytokine Production in Multiple Sclerosis: Correlation with Disease Symptomatology
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Sorenson, Matthew
Contact Address:Research, Edward Hines, Jr., VA Hospital, Bldg One 578/151, Hines, IL, 60141, USA
Co-Authors:Linda Janusek; Herbert Mathews
Individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) commonly report that states of psychological stress presage the onset of disease exacerbations. Established networks linking the brain and immune system provide a mechanism whereby heightened levels of perceived stress can adversely effect MS symptomatology through modulation of the immune system. In those with MS, the interplay or equilibrium, among cytokines is believed disrupted. Individuals with MS exhibit a cytokine profile characterized by elevated levels of select pro-inflammatory cytokines. In contrast, anti-inflammatory cytokines reduce disease severity. Previous studies demonstrate that psychological stress results in the increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in normative control populations. The purpose of this descriptive correlational study was to examine the relationships among disease symptomatology, psychological stress, and cytokine production from peripheral blood mononuclear cells in a population of MS outpatients (n=43) and normative controls (n=38). Cytokines measured included: interleukin (IL)-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, interferon-gamma (IFN-g), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-a). Stress was measured using the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and the Profile of Mood States (POMS); clinical disease was measured using the Multiple Sclerosis Symptom Checklist. In MS subjects psychological stress and clinical disease significantly correlated with the production of both a pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-6) and an anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10). In contrast, psychological stress in control subjects significantly correlated with the presence of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-12, IFN-g). As well, compared to controls, MS subjects exhibited a significant four-fold increase in IL-12 production. Thus, there is a differential pattern of cytokine production in relation to psychological stress between individuals with MS and normative controls. These findings illustrate the intimate links among brain, behavior, and immunity, in a manner such that perceived stress can modify immune function. Nursing is a discipline well poised to develop and test biobehavioral interventions that can aid those with MS through modification of the stress response. AN: MN030283
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePsychological Stress and Cytokine Production in Multiple Sclerosis: Correlation with Disease Symptomatologyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158652-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Psychological Stress and Cytokine Production in Multiple Sclerosis: Correlation with Disease Symptomatology </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sorenson, Matthew</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Research, Edward Hines, Jr., VA Hospital, Bldg One 578/151, Hines, IL, 60141, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Linda Janusek; Herbert Mathews </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) commonly report that states of psychological stress presage the onset of disease exacerbations. Established networks linking the brain and immune system provide a mechanism whereby heightened levels of perceived stress can adversely effect MS symptomatology through modulation of the immune system. In those with MS, the interplay or equilibrium, among cytokines is believed disrupted. Individuals with MS exhibit a cytokine profile characterized by elevated levels of select pro-inflammatory cytokines. In contrast, anti-inflammatory cytokines reduce disease severity. Previous studies demonstrate that psychological stress results in the increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in normative control populations. The purpose of this descriptive correlational study was to examine the relationships among disease symptomatology, psychological stress, and cytokine production from peripheral blood mononuclear cells in a population of MS outpatients (n=43) and normative controls (n=38). Cytokines measured included: interleukin (IL)-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, interferon-gamma (IFN-g), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-a). Stress was measured using the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and the Profile of Mood States (POMS); clinical disease was measured using the Multiple Sclerosis Symptom Checklist. In MS subjects psychological stress and clinical disease significantly correlated with the production of both a pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-6) and an anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10). In contrast, psychological stress in control subjects significantly correlated with the presence of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-12, IFN-g). As well, compared to controls, MS subjects exhibited a significant four-fold increase in IL-12 production. Thus, there is a differential pattern of cytokine production in relation to psychological stress between individuals with MS and normative controls. These findings illustrate the intimate links among brain, behavior, and immunity, in a manner such that perceived stress can modify immune function. Nursing is a discipline well poised to develop and test biobehavioral interventions that can aid those with MS through modification of the stress response. AN: MN030283 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:15:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:15:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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