2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158654
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Learning from our Elders: Memories of World War II
Abstract:
Learning from our Elders: Memories of World War II
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Taft, Lois
Contact Address: Nursing Systems, 105 Garfield Avenue, PO Box 4004, Eau Claire, WI, 54702, USA
Co-Authors:Mary Ellen Stolder
The purpose of this qualitative research project was to examine oral histories about World War II experiences of older adults living in nursing home and community settings. A naturalistic inquiry design guided data collection and analysis. Twenty-six older adults, age 74 to 92, were interviewed. Twelve nursing home residents and fourteen community residents described their memories of World War II. Four of the ten interviews conducted in the community included both husband and wife. An open-ended interview guide was used to collect data about experiences from both the military and the home front. All interviews were tape recorded and transcribed. Case reports were developed from each transcript summarizing the informant’s oral history. Follow-up visits were scheduled to verify the accuracy of the data, and each participant received a copy of their memoir. Inductive analysis was used to identify themes and report data from multiple informants under thematic categories. Participants were asked: “Where were you on Pearl Harbor Day?” and they responded with compelling stories. Stories about Pearl Harbor Day and about other experiences in the military and on the home front are summarized. The theme of self-sufficiency is described along with lessons identified by our elders. This project provides historical documentation of personal experiences of older adults and preserves oral history from a decade that changed the course of the world. Results are interpreted according to Gunderson’s conceptual framework for establishing a therapeutic milieu. Based on this framework, nurses have a critical role to create a culture that provides for involvement and validation in the care of older adults. Oral history projects provide an approach to support a therapeutic milieu. Over the next decade, memories of World War II remain a meaningful topic for oral histories that can enhance the quality of life for elders, preserve history, and link generations. AN: MN030210
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLearning from our Elders: Memories of World War IIen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158654-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Learning from our Elders: Memories of World War II </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Taft, Lois</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value"> Nursing Systems, 105 Garfield Avenue, PO Box 4004, Eau Claire, WI, 54702, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mary Ellen Stolder</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this qualitative research project was to examine oral histories about World War II experiences of older adults living in nursing home and community settings. A naturalistic inquiry design guided data collection and analysis. Twenty-six older adults, age 74 to 92, were interviewed. Twelve nursing home residents and fourteen community residents described their memories of World War II. Four of the ten interviews conducted in the community included both husband and wife. An open-ended interview guide was used to collect data about experiences from both the military and the home front. All interviews were tape recorded and transcribed. Case reports were developed from each transcript summarizing the informant&rsquo;s oral history. Follow-up visits were scheduled to verify the accuracy of the data, and each participant received a copy of their memoir. Inductive analysis was used to identify themes and report data from multiple informants under thematic categories. Participants were asked: &ldquo;Where were you on Pearl Harbor Day?&rdquo; and they responded with compelling stories. Stories about Pearl Harbor Day and about other experiences in the military and on the home front are summarized. The theme of self-sufficiency is described along with lessons identified by our elders. This project provides historical documentation of personal experiences of older adults and preserves oral history from a decade that changed the course of the world. Results are interpreted according to Gunderson&rsquo;s conceptual framework for establishing a therapeutic milieu. Based on this framework, nurses have a critical role to create a culture that provides for involvement and validation in the care of older adults. Oral history projects provide an approach to support a therapeutic milieu. Over the next decade, memories of World War II remain a meaningful topic for oral histories that can enhance the quality of life for elders, preserve history, and link generations. AN: MN030210</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:16:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:16:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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