Effects of Teaching Resourcefulness Skills on Indicators of Health in Elders in Retirement Communities

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158655
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of Teaching Resourcefulness Skills on Indicators of Health in Elders in Retirement Communities
Abstract:
Effects of Teaching Resourcefulness Skills on Indicators of Health in Elders in Retirement Communities
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Zauszniewski, Jaclene
Contact Address:Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA
Co-Authors:Karen Krafcik; Sunida Preechawong; ChaeWeon Chung; Diana L. Morris; Beverly L. Roberts; Noreen Brady
The U.S. elderly population will grow by nearly 80% in the next 25 years and about 80% of them will develop a chronic condition that limits their self-care ability and affects their psychological and physical functioning. Elders with impaired functioning sometimes relocate to retirement communities (RCs) where they receive assistance with daily activities. Although elders value their independence, self-management of chronic conditions requires resourcefulness skills that include self-control and problem-solving. Rosenbaum’s theory of resourcefulness suggests such skills are learned and can therefore be taught. An NINR-funded clinical trial examined the effects of a 6-week, small group, resourcefulness training intervention for 46 elders in 4 randomly selected RCs. Since teaching resourcefulness skills involved reminiscence, a comparison group of 43 elders in 4 RCs participated in a reminiscence only group. Data were collected during one pre-intervention and three post-intervention interviews using measures of self-assessed health, anxiety, depression, and functional status. Elders in resourcefulness and reminiscence groups did not differ on dependent measures at baseline or at 2 weeks after the groups. Six weeks post-intervention, the resourcefulness group had significantly better functioning (t=-2.19, p< .05) and greater resourcefulness (t=2.24, p< .05) and these effects lasted for another 6 weeks (t’s=.3.18 and 1.97, p’s< .01 and >.05). The resourcefulness group had significantly better self-assessed health (t=2.70, p < .01) 12 weeks post intervention. There were no changes on anxiety or depression over time; however, both anxiety and depression were significantly correlated with functional status (r’s=.29 and .35, p’s < .01), self-assessed health (r’s=-.18 and -.26, p’s < .05), and resourcefulness (t’s=-.24 and -.21, p’s< .05). The findings suggest that in comparison with reminiscence, teaching resourcefulness to groups of elders in RCs has beneficial effects on improving their perception of health and functioning. AN: MN030148
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of Teaching Resourcefulness Skills on Indicators of Health in Elders in Retirement Communitiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158655-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effects of Teaching Resourcefulness Skills on Indicators of Health in Elders in Retirement Communities</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Zauszniewski, Jaclene</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Karen Krafcik; Sunida Preechawong; ChaeWeon Chung; Diana L. Morris; Beverly L. Roberts; Noreen Brady </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The U.S. elderly population will grow by nearly 80% in the next 25 years and about 80% of them will develop a chronic condition that limits their self-care ability and affects their psychological and physical functioning. Elders with impaired functioning sometimes relocate to retirement communities (RCs) where they receive assistance with daily activities. Although elders value their independence, self-management of chronic conditions requires resourcefulness skills that include self-control and problem-solving. Rosenbaum&rsquo;s theory of resourcefulness suggests such skills are learned and can therefore be taught. An NINR-funded clinical trial examined the effects of a 6-week, small group, resourcefulness training intervention for 46 elders in 4 randomly selected RCs. Since teaching resourcefulness skills involved reminiscence, a comparison group of 43 elders in 4 RCs participated in a reminiscence only group. Data were collected during one pre-intervention and three post-intervention interviews using measures of self-assessed health, anxiety, depression, and functional status. Elders in resourcefulness and reminiscence groups did not differ on dependent measures at baseline or at 2 weeks after the groups. Six weeks post-intervention, the resourcefulness group had significantly better functioning (t=-2.19, p&lt; .05) and greater resourcefulness (t=2.24, p&lt; .05) and these effects lasted for another 6 weeks (t&rsquo;s=.3.18 and 1.97, p&rsquo;s&lt; .01 and &gt;.05). The resourcefulness group had significantly better self-assessed health (t=2.70, p &lt; .01) 12 weeks post intervention. There were no changes on anxiety or depression over time; however, both anxiety and depression were significantly correlated with functional status (r&rsquo;s=.29 and .35, p&rsquo;s &lt; .01), self-assessed health (r&rsquo;s=-.18 and -.26, p&rsquo;s &lt; .05), and resourcefulness (t&rsquo;s=-.24 and -.21, p&rsquo;s&lt; .05). The findings suggest that in comparison with reminiscence, teaching resourcefulness to groups of elders in RCs has beneficial effects on improving their perception of health and functioning. AN: MN030148 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:16:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:16:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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