2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158657
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Diversity in Co-Occurring Symptoms in Depressed Japanese and American Women
Abstract:
Diversity in Co-Occurring Symptoms in Depressed Japanese and American Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Arnault, Denise, PhD, RN
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:CON, A110 Life Sciences Bldg, East Lansing, MI, 48824, USA
Somatization in depression is a worldwide phenomenon that complicates the accuracy of assessment and referral in primary care settings. People show cultural differences in the symptoms they display, and many non-western peoples tend not to verbalize in psychologically-oriented ways. International depressed patients seeking primary care who report only physical symptoms range from 45 to 95%, with 11% denying depressive emotions upon direct questioning. In Japanese clinics, physical symptoms with depression are 13-15%. This present study gathered baseline depression scores, and then used 7-day distress diaries to gather emotional, somatic and interpersonal distress symptoms in samples of 50 women in Japan and the in the US. We then examined the differences in symptom means for low and high Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scores (BDI cutoff 15). High BDI Americans showed significantly higher means for the emotional symptoms of drowsiness, depression and guilt (p < .02); while high BDI Japanese showed significantly higher means for the emotional symptoms of feeling scared, nervousness, anger, frustration, feeling "blue" and gloominess. High BDI Americans showed significantly higher means for the somatic symptoms of swollen joints, headache and sluggishness; while high BDI Japanese showed significantly higher means for the somatic symptoms of weakness, faintness, dizziness, lightheadedness, numbness, coldness, chills, abdominal pain, stomachache, abdominal cramps, heartburn, indigestion, pain in the throat, pain in the shoulders, stiff joints, inability to breathe, and palpitations (p < .03). Finally, high BDI Americans showed a significantly higher mean only for the interpersonal symptom of jealousy (p=.03); while high BDI Japanese showed significantly higher means for the interpersonal symptoms of loneliness, alienation, suspicion, resignation, withdrawal, vulnerability, hostility, abandonment, and distrust (p < .05). Implications for primary and mental health care are discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDiversity in Co-Occurring Symptoms in Depressed Japanese and American Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158657-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Diversity in Co-Occurring Symptoms in Depressed Japanese and American Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Arnault, Denise, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, A110 Life Sciences Bldg, East Lansing, MI, 48824, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Somatization in depression is a worldwide phenomenon that complicates the accuracy of assessment and referral in primary care settings. People show cultural differences in the symptoms they display, and many non-western peoples tend not to verbalize in psychologically-oriented ways. International depressed patients seeking primary care who report only physical symptoms range from 45 to 95%, with 11% denying depressive emotions upon direct questioning. In Japanese clinics, physical symptoms with depression are 13-15%. This present study gathered baseline depression scores, and then used 7-day distress diaries to gather emotional, somatic and interpersonal distress symptoms in samples of 50 women in Japan and the in the US. We then examined the differences in symptom means for low and high Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scores (BDI cutoff 15). High BDI Americans showed significantly higher means for the emotional symptoms of drowsiness, depression and guilt (p &lt; .02); while high BDI Japanese showed significantly higher means for the emotional symptoms of feeling scared, nervousness, anger, frustration, feeling &quot;blue&quot; and gloominess. High BDI Americans showed significantly higher means for the somatic symptoms of swollen joints, headache and sluggishness; while high BDI Japanese showed significantly higher means for the somatic symptoms of weakness, faintness, dizziness, lightheadedness, numbness, coldness, chills, abdominal pain, stomachache, abdominal cramps, heartburn, indigestion, pain in the throat, pain in the shoulders, stiff joints, inability to breathe, and palpitations (p &lt; .03). Finally, high BDI Americans showed a significantly higher mean only for the interpersonal symptom of jealousy (p=.03); while high BDI Japanese showed significantly higher means for the interpersonal symptoms of loneliness, alienation, suspicion, resignation, withdrawal, vulnerability, hostility, abandonment, and distrust (p &lt; .05). Implications for primary and mental health care are discussed. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:16:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:16:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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