2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158659
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Storytelling as a strategy for conveying health behavior change information
Abstract:
Storytelling as a strategy for conveying health behavior change information
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Banks-Wallace, JoAnne, PhD, RN
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Nursing - MU, Sinclair School of Nursing S-324, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA
Development of efficacious interventions to promote routine physical activity among sedentary African American women at risk for cardiovascular disease is a major public health concern. This paper explicates the value of storytelling as an integral component of a 12-month group physical activity intervention. The primary aim of our study was to measure the effect of a culture-based intervention on problem solving, social support, general physical activity, and walking behavior. Womanist Theory and Social Cognitive Theory were used as the theoretical framework for our pilot study. These theories are linked through a shared focus on the intersection between experience, awareness, and behavior. A convenience sample was comprised of 21 community dwelling, sedentary, hypertensive African American women between the ages of 25-68. Monthly meetings included storytelling by a professional storyteller and a debriefing period during which participants shared their responses to the session. These segments of the meeting were audio taped and transcribed. They serve as the data for this paper. Transcripts will be analyzed using a narrative technique developed by the primary investigator. Major themes will be identified, strategies to promote problem-solving skill development and enhanced social support for being physically active embedded within stories will be elucidated, and implications for future health promotion research will be discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStorytelling as a strategy for conveying health behavior change informationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158659-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Storytelling as a strategy for conveying health behavior change information </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Banks-Wallace, JoAnne, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing - MU, Sinclair School of Nursing S-324, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Development of efficacious interventions to promote routine physical activity among sedentary African American women at risk for cardiovascular disease is a major public health concern. This paper explicates the value of storytelling as an integral component of a 12-month group physical activity intervention. The primary aim of our study was to measure the effect of a culture-based intervention on problem solving, social support, general physical activity, and walking behavior. Womanist Theory and Social Cognitive Theory were used as the theoretical framework for our pilot study. These theories are linked through a shared focus on the intersection between experience, awareness, and behavior. A convenience sample was comprised of 21 community dwelling, sedentary, hypertensive African American women between the ages of 25-68. Monthly meetings included storytelling by a professional storyteller and a debriefing period during which participants shared their responses to the session. These segments of the meeting were audio taped and transcribed. They serve as the data for this paper. Transcripts will be analyzed using a narrative technique developed by the primary investigator. Major themes will be identified, strategies to promote problem-solving skill development and enhanced social support for being physically active embedded within stories will be elucidated, and implications for future health promotion research will be discussed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:16:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:16:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.